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Participate in research

Are you thinking about participating in research?

Make an informed decision by reading Deciding whether to participate in research: A community resource for Australians who live with a disability, produced by The Hopkins Centre and AHRECS.

Research Participation Final from Instructor Training on Vimeo.

Are you a researcher and would like to use this site to promote a project?

Please visit our Request for research participants page for more information.


Research projects seeking participants

Person-first versus identity-first language: Informing client-centred care

This research aims to understand the preferences of people with a health condition/disability when it comes to the use of person-first (e.g. person who has had a stroke) versus identity-first (e.g. stroke survivor/stroke patient) language. This research is important to maximise respectful language use when addressing people across different disabilities and health conditions. Participation requires completion of a 10–15 minute survey that asks your language preferences related to different disabilities and health conditions, as well as information about how comfortable you are with your disability/health condition and your quality of life.

Find out more about the study

 

Video for anxiety after stroke

You are invited to take part in research.
Who: Stroke survivors living with aphasia.
What: Research trial for relaxation training for mood problems after stroke.
Where: Online on Vimeo.
When: October 2021.
Why: To help us evaluate a relaxation video for people with aphasia.

Find out more about the study

 

ADaPT: Aphasia, Depression, and Psychological Treatment

Recruitment is continuing for this study, seeking expressions of interest from people with aphasia and low mood/depression after stroke. Research participants will take part in a 10-session intervention program delivered by a qualified clinical neuropsychologist, at no cost. Sessions will be individual, and either face-to-face in Melbourne (south-east suburb), or via telehealth, with a COVID-safe protocol.

Find out more about the study

 

Co-designing exercise program for non-ambulatory stroke survivors

Have you had a stroke in the last 12 months, AND were you unable to walk independently after your stroke? Researchers from Deakin University would like you to take part in a workshop and interviews, where you will be asked about your views and opinions about exercise for stroke rehabilitation.

Find out more about the study

 

Preventing Stroke Research Priorities Project

The Preventing Stroke Research Priorities project aims to identify a Top 10 list of questions the community and clinicians want answered about preventing stroke. The first step in this project is an online survey asking what questions people have about preventing stroke, to help researchers focus on the questions that matter most. The survey takes around 10–15 minutes and is completely anonymous.

Find out more about the study

 

Antiplatelet Secondary Prevention International Randomised trial after INtracerebral haemorrhage (ASPIRING trial)

The ASPIRING trial aims to determine if single antiplatelet (blood-thinning) medication after a bleed (haemorrhage) in the brain is of net benefit in preventing all future serious vascular events (caused by blood clots in blood vessels, or bleeding from them). Survivors of brain haemorrhage who are interested in participating will be asked to discuss their participation with their doctor, before being randomly allocated to either taking or avoiding antiplatelet therapy. Trial participation is for 4 years, with telephone assessments by the trial coordinating centre in Perth WA at 1, 3, and 6 months after randomisation and then 6-monthly.

Find out more about the study

 

Speech pathologists wanted for NDIS speak up study

The NDIS is critically important to people with acquired brain injury (ABI) and a lot has been happening! Speech pathologists are needed to join an online focus group about NDIS services and assessments for people with ABI. What works? What are the issues now and into the future that we need to know about?

Find out more about the study

 

Advisory Group for a feasibility study of Nut supplementation to mitigate post-stroke cognitive decline (NUT-me)

Researchers at Monash University are currently seeking survivors of stroke to join an Advisory Group for a pilot study on the efficacy and feasibility of supplementing the habitual diet of stroke survivors with a supply of mixed nuts to mitigate post-stroke cognitive decline. Nuts are a common point in dietary patterns rich in foods with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that reduce the risk of dementia and stroke, but no research has investigated its effects on post-stroke cognitive decline. The Advisory Group will be consulted at the beginning of the trial in order to refine details related to the intervention, and will be invited to monthly Steering Committee meetings and will provide insight in the development of information materials.

Find out more about the study

 

RESET (Resuming Employment after Stroke - Enhancement through Telecoordination) Advisory Network

RESET has been developed as a coordination and support service for stroke survivors wishing to return to work. The research team are forming an Advisory Network whose experiences with stroke and/or returning to work after injury or illness, will hopefully provide valuable information that can help ensure that the RESET service is suitable for stroke survivors throughout Australia.

Find out more about the study

 

Food Choices after Stroke: A cross sectional analysis of the current diet and eating behaviour of stroke survivors

This study aims to explore the current dietary intake and eating patterns of stroke survivors and to understand the factors affecting their food choices. We will use the data collected to inform the development of a diet program to help stroke survivors eat a healthier diet. Stroke/TIA survivors will be invited to complete two online surveys, with some individual interviews with people who indicate that they would like to participate further.

Find out more about the study

 

FoCCuS4HEART: Female Carers Co-produce Support 4 Heart and Emotional health to Address Risk facTors

Phase 1: a survey of the health behaviours and emotional health among female carers of stroke survivors. Researchers from the University of Newcastle are conducting the FoCCuS4HEART project, which seeks to work with informal female carers of stroke survivors to develop strategies and tools to support carers to self-manage their emotional and physical health. If you’re a woman who provides care or has provided care to someone who has had a stroke, you can help by sharing your experiences in our online survey.

Find out more about the study

 

Learnings from lockdown: experiences and perspectives from individuals with ABI and their carers in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic

Researchers from La Trobe University in Melbourne are are asking people who have had an acquired brain injury (ABI), including stroke, TBI, hypoxic brain injury, encephalitis, etc., and carers of individuals with ABI to complete a survey exploring how the pandemic has affected your health, mood, relationships, work, general behaviour, and rehabilitation and recovery from ABI. You will also be able to indicate whether you are interested in participating in a follow-up interview where the team will ask you further questions about your experience of the pandemic and lockdowns.

Find out more about the study

 

Co-design of a personalised physical activity intervention for stroke survivors

The aim of this study is to design a pathway to personalised, engaging and targeted physical activity programs for stroke survivors. Researchers working together with stroke survivors, carers and clinicians will “co-design” a new physical activity intervention, using an integrated knowledge translation approach, that will be tested in a future trial. Participants will be asked to join 1 or 2 workshops, either in person, or from home via phone or video.

Find out more about the study

 

View of individuals with slurring of speech (dysarthria) on speech-language therapy and future treatment directions

This research involves a 10–15 minute online questionnaire about current speech-language therapy practices for slurring of speech (dysarthria). The researchers are also interested in understanding whether persons with slurred speech would be interested in participating in research involving new treatment opportunities.

Find out more about the study

 

Evaluating Antidepressants for emotionaliSm after strokE – consumer/lived experience group

The George Institute in Sydney, Australia and the University of East Anglia in the UK are planning a study to test if an antidepressant (a drug normally used to treat depression) would be an effective treatment for post-stroke emotionalism. Emotionalism means that you cry, or laugh, without warning, inappropriately, and you cannot control it. This can negatively affect people's lives. As part of planning for this study, the researchers want to try and find out what members of the public, people with stroke, their family and/or carers think about the idea and their plans on how to do the research, to make sure they are doing good, useful research.

Find out more about the study

 

Evaluating attitudes of older adults to sexuality and the relevant supports they need

This research project is evaluating the attitudes, behaviours and perspectives of older adults towards sexuality, to understand the impacts of the ageing experience on sexuality and what community and health supports may be necessary in this area. Sexuality in this study is referring to your sexual health, sexual activity and intimate relationships. The study involves an anonymous online survey that will take approximately 20–30 minutes.

Find out more about the study

 

Perispinal Etanercept to improve Stroke Outcomes (PESTO) clinical trial

Funded by the Federal Government through the Medical Research Future Fund, Australia’s first multi-centred international clinical trial of perispinal etanercept in chronic stroke is actively recruiting participants. This trial seeks to determine if perispinal etanercept improves quality of life in working age survivors of stroke with a moderate to severe disability, and if repeated treatments lead to more improvement compared to one treatment. Australian sites are located in Melbourne, Victoria. We understand that interstate travel is particularly challenging at the moment, and we take the time to ensure that anyone who is interested and eligible makes an informed decision about participating.

Find out more about the study

 

More than a meal: a constructivist grounded theory of mealtime quality of life and inclusion for people with a swallowing disability (research)

This study is about the impacts of swallowing difficulties (dysphagia) on quality of life, participation, and inclusion. We are also looking at the use of 3D food printing to create visually appealing texture-modified foods. There are four parts to the study, including looking at records of mealtimes, observing your swallowing, interviewing you about how your swallowing difficulties impact your quality of life, and demonstrating 3D food printing. All parts of the study can be done online via Zoom.

Find out more about the study

 

Stroke survivors’ perspectives: deciding whether to take medications that might increase physical recovery

The aim of this study is to learn what is really important to stroke survivors when making decisions about taking medications that might increase their physical recovery when participating in rehabilitation. The study involves an online survey with a series of questions comparing different medications and asks stroke survivors to decide which option they would prefer to take.

Find out more about the study

 

Tele-PC Study

People with cardiovascular disease who have received healthcare using telehealth are invited to participate in a brief phone/video interview to discuss their experiences of receiving healthcare via telehealth.

Find out more about the study

 

Support After Stroke using group-based classeS: The SASS Study

Researchers from Monash University are looking for volunteer presenters or stroke survivors themselves (where relevant) to share knowledge and guidance principles on relevant topics for participants in The SASS Study. The study aims to test the potential effectiveness of two alternate group-based intervention classes provided for 12 weeks to survivors of stroke living in the community. The presentations focus on lifestyle management strategies for life ‘after stroke’ to support greater self-management and independence. Pre-recording of the presentations will be facilitated online, approximately 15–30 minutes in length and supported by a slide template kit provided by the research team.

Find out more about the study

 

The Wellbeing Neuro Course: examining the efficacy of an online treatment program for adults with neurological disorders

Macquarie University’s eCentreClinic is looking for adults with an acquired brain injury or stroke to take part in and evaluate a free online course to help Australians with neurological disorders learn to manage stress, frustration and worry, sadness and depression, and day-to-day activities.

Find out more about the study

 

Enhancing physical activity: exploring referral pathways between general practitioners and exercise physiologists

This project is looking for people who have seen an exercise physiologist to complete an online survey. The research focuses on enhancing physical activity by exploring the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs), exercise physiologists and patients in relation to the outcomes of referral pathways.

Find out more about the study

 

Technology use acceptability survey for a restorative brain-computer interface designed to improve hand motor functions after a stroke

It is believed that impaired movement is caused by damage in specific parts of the brain, which in turn lead to disconnection in the neural pathways that are in charge of the movement. We have investigated a technique named motor imagery based brain-computer interfacing (MI-BCI) that allows re-routing of the impaired neural pathways caused by stroke. However, to further develop this technology we need to know the features of the interface that are most important for users and the considerations of cost relative to benefit.

Find out more about the study

 

Treatment for sleep disturbance and fatigue following acquired brain injury

Over half of the stroke population experiences problems with sleep or fatigue. Researchers at the Monash Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre are trialling two forms of therapy to treat sleep and fatigue problems following stroke: cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and health education (INFO) therapy. Participants engage in 8 sessions of therapy with a clinical neuropsychologist. These sessions can be completed in-person for local participants, or via a video conferencing program for interstate or rural participants.

Find out more about the study

 

Development of a sexuality intervention for stroke survivors and their partners

4 out of 5 Australian stroke survivors do not have the opportunity to discuss sexuality or receive information about sexuality. Sexuality is more than just about 'having sex', it also includes roles and identities, relationships and intimacy. Researchers from The University of Sydney would like to develop an educational package that can be provided to stroke survivors and partners of stroke survivors. The study aims to find out what topics should be included in this package and how it should be delivered. If you choose to participate you will be asked to complete two surveys about what you think is important for sexuality after stroke. Your responses are confidential and you will not be asked to share any information about your own experiences of sexuality.

Find out more about the study

 

Join the Communication Research Registry

The Communication Research Registry is a national register of people who would like to be involved in communication research. This includes research that looks into speech and language difficulties post stroke. People with communication difficulties, their family and friends and members of the public are invited to join.

Find out more about the Communication Research Registry

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Person-first versus identity-first language: Informing client-centred care

This research aims to understand the preferences of people with a health condition/disability when it comes to the use of person-first (e.g. person who has had a stroke) versus identity-first (e.g. stroke survivor/stroke patient) language. This research is important to maximise respectful language use when addressing people across different disabilities and health conditions. Participation requires completion of a 10–15 minute survey that asks your language preferences related to different disabilities and health conditions, as well as information about how comfortable you are with your disability/health condition and your quality of life.

Find out more about the study

 

Video for anxiety after stroke

You are invited to take part in research.
Who: Stroke survivors living with aphasia.
What: Research trial for relaxation training for mood problems after stroke.
Where: Online on Vimeo.
When: October 2021.
Why: To help us evaluate a relaxation video for people with aphasia.

Find out more about the study

 

ADaPT: Aphasia, Depression, and Psychological Treatment

Recruitment is continuing for this study, seeking expressions of interest from people with aphasia and low mood/depression after stroke. Research participants will take part in a 10-session intervention program delivered by a qualified clinical neuropsychologist, at no cost. Sessions will be individual, and either face-to-face in Melbourne (south-east suburb), or via telehealth, with a COVID-safe protocol.

Find out more about the study

 

Co-designing exercise program for non-ambulatory stroke survivors

Have you had a stroke in the last 12 months, AND were you unable to walk independently after your stroke? Researchers from Deakin University would like you to take part in a workshop and interviews, where you will be asked about your views and opinions about exercise for stroke rehabilitation.

Find out more about the study

 

Preventing Stroke Research Priorities Project

The Preventing Stroke Research Priorities project aims to identify a Top 10 list of questions the community and clinicians want answered about preventing stroke. The first step in this project is an online survey asking what questions people have about preventing stroke, to help researchers focus on the questions that matter most. The survey takes around 10–15 minutes and is completely anonymous.

Find out more about the study

 

Antiplatelet Secondary Prevention International Randomised trial after INtracerebral haemorrhage (ASPIRING trial)

The ASPIRING trial aims to determine if single antiplatelet (blood-thinning) medication after a bleed (haemorrhage) in the brain is of net benefit in preventing all future serious vascular events (caused by blood clots in blood vessels, or bleeding from them). Survivors of brain haemorrhage who are interested in participating will be asked to discuss their participation with their doctor, before being randomly allocated to either taking or avoiding antiplatelet therapy. Trial participation is for 4 years, with telephone assessments by the trial coordinating centre in Perth WA at 1, 3, and 6 months after randomisation and then 6-monthly.

Find out more about the study

 

Speech pathologists wanted for NDIS speak up study

The NDIS is critically important to people with acquired brain injury (ABI) and a lot has been happening! Speech pathologists are needed to join an online focus group about NDIS services and assessments for people with ABI. What works? What are the issues now and into the future that we need to know about?

Find out more about the study

 

Advisory Group for a feasibility study of Nut supplementation to mitigate post-stroke cognitive decline (NUT-me)

Researchers at Monash University are currently seeking survivors of stroke to join an Advisory Group for a pilot study on the efficacy and feasibility of supplementing the habitual diet of stroke survivors with a supply of mixed nuts to mitigate post-stroke cognitive decline. Nuts are a common point in dietary patterns rich in foods with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that reduce the risk of dementia and stroke, but no research has investigated its effects on post-stroke cognitive decline. The Advisory Group will be consulted at the beginning of the trial in order to refine details related to the intervention, and will be invited to monthly Steering Committee meetings and will provide insight in the development of information materials.

Find out more about the study

 

RESET (Resuming Employment after Stroke - Enhancement through Telecoordination) Advisory Network

RESET has been developed as a coordination and support service for stroke survivors wishing to return to work. The research team are forming an Advisory Network whose experiences with stroke and/or returning to work after injury or illness, will hopefully provide valuable information that can help ensure that the RESET service is suitable for stroke survivors throughout Australia.

Find out more about the study

 

Food Choices after Stroke: A cross sectional analysis of the current diet and eating behaviour of stroke survivors

This study aims to explore the current dietary intake and eating patterns of stroke survivors and to understand the factors affecting their food choices. We will use the data collected to inform the development of a diet program to help stroke survivors eat a healthier diet. Stroke/TIA survivors will be invited to complete two online surveys, with some individual interviews with people who indicate that they would like to participate further.

Find out more about the study

 

FoCCuS4HEART: Female Carers Co-produce Support 4 Heart and Emotional health to Address Risk facTors

Phase 1: a survey of the health behaviours and emotional health among female carers of stroke survivors. Researchers from the University of Newcastle are conducting the FoCCuS4HEART project, which seeks to work with informal female carers of stroke survivors to develop strategies and tools to support carers to self-manage their emotional and physical health. If you’re a woman who provides care or has provided care to someone who has had a stroke, you can help by sharing your experiences in our online survey.

Find out more about the study

 

Learnings from lockdown: experiences and perspectives from individuals with ABI and their carers in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic

Researchers from La Trobe University in Melbourne are are asking people who have had an acquired brain injury (ABI), including stroke, TBI, hypoxic brain injury, encephalitis, etc., and carers of individuals with ABI to complete a survey exploring how the pandemic has affected your health, mood, relationships, work, general behaviour, and rehabilitation and recovery from ABI. You will also be able to indicate whether you are interested in participating in a follow-up interview where the team will ask you further questions about your experience of the pandemic and lockdowns.

Find out more about the study

 

Co-design of a personalised physical activity intervention for stroke survivors

The aim of this study is to design a pathway to personalised, engaging and targeted physical activity programs for stroke survivors. Researchers working together with stroke survivors, carers and clinicians will “co-design” a new physical activity intervention, using an integrated knowledge translation approach, that will be tested in a future trial. Participants will be asked to join 1 or 2 workshops, either in person, or from home via phone or video.

Find out more about the study

 

View of individuals with slurring of speech (dysarthria) on speech-language therapy and future treatment directions

This research involves a 10–15 minute online questionnaire about current speech-language therapy practices for slurring of speech (dysarthria). The researchers are also interested in understanding whether persons with slurred speech would be interested in participating in research involving new treatment opportunities.

Find out more about the study

 

Evaluating Antidepressants for emotionaliSm after strokE – consumer/lived experience group

The George Institute in Sydney, Australia and the University of East Anglia in the UK are planning a study to test if an antidepressant (a drug normally used to treat depression) would be an effective treatment for post-stroke emotionalism. Emotionalism means that you cry, or laugh, without warning, inappropriately, and you cannot control it. This can negatively affect people's lives. As part of planning for this study, the researchers want to try and find out what members of the public, people with stroke, their family and/or carers think about the idea and their plans on how to do the research, to make sure they are doing good, useful research.

Find out more about the study

 

Evaluating attitudes of older adults to sexuality and the relevant supports they need

This research project is evaluating the attitudes, behaviours and perspectives of older adults towards sexuality, to understand the impacts of the ageing experience on sexuality and what community and health supports may be necessary in this area. Sexuality in this study is referring to your sexual health, sexual activity and intimate relationships. The study involves an anonymous online survey that will take approximately 20–30 minutes.

Find out more about the study

 

Perispinal Etanercept to improve Stroke Outcomes (PESTO) clinical trial

Funded by the Federal Government through the Medical Research Future Fund, Australia’s first multi-centred international clinical trial of perispinal etanercept in chronic stroke is actively recruiting participants. This trial seeks to determine if perispinal etanercept improves quality of life in working age survivors of stroke with a moderate to severe disability, and if repeated treatments lead to more improvement compared to one treatment. Australian sites are located in Melbourne, Victoria. We understand that interstate travel is particularly challenging at the moment, and we take the time to ensure that anyone who is interested and eligible makes an informed decision about participating.

Find out more about the study

 

More than a meal: a constructivist grounded theory of mealtime quality of life and inclusion for people with a swallowing disability (research)

This study is about the impacts of swallowing difficulties (dysphagia) on quality of life, participation, and inclusion. We are also looking at the use of 3D food printing to create visually appealing texture-modified foods. There are four parts to the study, including looking at records of mealtimes, observing your swallowing, interviewing you about how your swallowing difficulties impact your quality of life, and demonstrating 3D food printing. All parts of the study can be done online via Zoom.

Find out more about the study

 

Stroke survivors’ perspectives: deciding whether to take medications that might increase physical recovery

The aim of this study is to learn what is really important to stroke survivors when making decisions about taking medications that might increase their physical recovery when participating in rehabilitation. The study involves an online survey with a series of questions comparing different medications and asks stroke survivors to decide which option they would prefer to take.

Find out more about the study

 

Tele-PC Study

People with cardiovascular disease who have received healthcare using telehealth are invited to participate in a brief phone/video interview to discuss their experiences of receiving healthcare via telehealth.

Find out more about the study

 

Support After Stroke using group-based classeS: The SASS Study

Researchers from Monash University are looking for volunteer presenters or stroke survivors themselves (where relevant) to share knowledge and guidance principles on relevant topics for participants in The SASS Study. The study aims to test the potential effectiveness of two alternate group-based intervention classes provided for 12 weeks to survivors of stroke living in the community. The presentations focus on lifestyle management strategies for life ‘after stroke’ to support greater self-management and independence. Pre-recording of the presentations will be facilitated online, approximately 15–30 minutes in length and supported by a slide template kit provided by the research team.

Find out more about the study

 

The Wellbeing Neuro Course: examining the efficacy of an online treatment program for adults with neurological disorders

Macquarie University’s eCentreClinic is looking for adults with an acquired brain injury or stroke to take part in and evaluate a free online course to help Australians with neurological disorders learn to manage stress, frustration and worry, sadness and depression, and day-to-day activities.

Find out more about the study

 

Enhancing physical activity: exploring referral pathways between general practitioners and exercise physiologists

This project is looking for people who have seen an exercise physiologist to complete an online survey. The research focuses on enhancing physical activity by exploring the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs), exercise physiologists and patients in relation to the outcomes of referral pathways.

Find out more about the study

 

Technology use acceptability survey for a restorative brain-computer interface designed to improve hand motor functions after a stroke

It is believed that impaired movement is caused by damage in specific parts of the brain, which in turn lead to disconnection in the neural pathways that are in charge of the movement. We have investigated a technique named motor imagery based brain-computer interfacing (MI-BCI) that allows re-routing of the impaired neural pathways caused by stroke. However, to further develop this technology we need to know the features of the interface that are most important for users and the considerations of cost relative to benefit.

Find out more about the study

 

Treatment for sleep disturbance and fatigue following acquired brain injury

Over half of the stroke population experiences problems with sleep or fatigue. Researchers at the Monash Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre are trialling two forms of therapy to treat sleep and fatigue problems following stroke: cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and health education (INFO) therapy. Participants engage in 8 sessions of therapy with a clinical neuropsychologist. These sessions can be completed in-person for local participants, or via a video conferencing program for interstate or rural participants.

Find out more about the study

 

Development of a sexuality intervention for stroke survivors and their partners

4 out of 5 Australian stroke survivors do not have the opportunity to discuss sexuality or receive information about sexuality. Sexuality is more than just about 'having sex', it also includes roles and identities, relationships and intimacy. Researchers from The University of Sydney would like to develop an educational package that can be provided to stroke survivors and partners of stroke survivors. The study aims to find out what topics should be included in this package and how it should be delivered. If you choose to participate you will be asked to complete two surveys about what you think is important for sexuality after stroke. Your responses are confidential and you will not be asked to share any information about your own experiences of sexuality.

Find out more about the study

 

Join the Communication Research Registry

The Communication Research Registry is a national register of people who would like to be involved in communication research. This includes research that looks into speech and language difficulties post stroke. People with communication difficulties, their family and friends and members of the public are invited to join.

Find out more about the Communication Research Registry

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Falls after stroke trial

The Falls After Stroke Trial (FAST) is testing a novel at-home exercise and safety training program. It aims to reduce your risk of falling and increase your ability to do daily activities. The research team seeks people in Canberra or Sydney who have had a stroke in the last 5 years, are aged over 50 years and can walk 10 metres (with or without a walking aid). The intervention involves an exercise program which requires no extra time during the day.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Falls after stroke trial

The Falls After Stroke Trial (FAST) is testing a novel at-home exercise and safety training program. It aims to reduce your risk of falling and increase your ability to do daily activities. The research team seeks people in Canberra or Sydney who have had a stroke in the last 5 years, are aged over 50 years and can walk 10 metres (with or without a walking aid). The intervention involves an exercise program which requires no extra time during the day.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

Find out more about the study

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

Find out more about the study

 

Understanding the health and support needs of younger people with disabilities discharged from hospitals to residential aged care

We are looking for feedback on our research from younger people (<65 years old) in the greater Sydney region who are living in residential aged care, their carers, and their families. The study aims to examine the pathways younger people take into residential aged care, as well as their health outcomes living in residential aged care. Participants will talk to a researcher and give feedback on our research plan, and give advice on spreading research findings. There will be 8 sessions over 3 years, with each session between half an hour to an hour in length.

Find out more about the study

 

Falls after stroke trial

The Falls After Stroke Trial (FAST) is testing a novel at-home exercise and safety training program. It aims to reduce your risk of falling and increase your ability to do daily activities. The research team seeks people in Sydney or Canberra who have had a stroke in the last 5 years, are aged over 50 years and can walk 10 metres (with or without a walking aid). The intervention involves an exercise program which requires no extra time during the day.

Find out more about the study

 

A comparative open label study comparing the efficacy of structured physiotherapy vs non-structured physiotherapy in reducing post-stroke spasticity-related shoulder pain in patients treated with botulinum toxin A

Shoulder pain is a very common and troublesome complication after stroke. One of the factors most frequently associated with shoulder pain is spasticity. This focal spasticity (muscle tightness or stiffness) can also lead to restricted use of the arm, interfering with activities of daily living. The primary purpose of this study is to better understand whether botulinum toxin and physiotherapy can be used as a treatment for muscle stiffness and tightness in the shoulder after stroke in patients who have shoulder pain.

Find out more about the study

 

Improving arm function after stroke using task-specific training

Many people who experience a stroke have difficulty moving their arm and hand, and research has shown that people can still have non-functional arms at 6 months after stroke. Our researchers are conducting a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial to test whether a programme of specific training exercises is more effective than usual care. We are seeking people with stroke who have difficulty using their arm and/or hand to take part in this study. The study will involve assessments of arm and hand function before and after a 6 week period, with a follow-up assessment after 6 months.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

Find out more about the study

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

Find out more about the study

 

Understanding the health and support needs of younger people with disabilities discharged from hospitals to residential aged care

We are looking for feedback on our research from younger people (<65 years old) in the greater Sydney region who are living in residential aged care, their carers, and their families. The study aims to examine the pathways younger people take into residential aged care, as well as their health outcomes living in residential aged care. Participants will talk to a researcher and give feedback on our research plan, and give advice on spreading research findings. There will be 8 sessions over 3 years, with each session between half an hour to an hour in length.

Find out more about the study

 

Falls after stroke trial

The Falls After Stroke Trial (FAST) is testing a novel at-home exercise and safety training program. It aims to reduce your risk of falling and increase your ability to do daily activities. The research team seeks people in Sydney or Canberra who have had a stroke in the last 5 years, are aged over 50 years and can walk 10 metres (with or without a walking aid). The intervention involves an exercise program which requires no extra time during the day.

Find out more about the study

 

A comparative open label study comparing the efficacy of structured physiotherapy vs non-structured physiotherapy in reducing post-stroke spasticity-related shoulder pain in patients treated with botulinum toxin A

Shoulder pain is a very common and troublesome complication after stroke. One of the factors most frequently associated with shoulder pain is spasticity. This focal spasticity (muscle tightness or stiffness) can also lead to restricted use of the arm, interfering with activities of daily living. The primary purpose of this study is to better understand whether botulinum toxin and physiotherapy can be used as a treatment for muscle stiffness and tightness in the shoulder after stroke in patients who have shoulder pain.

Find out more about the study

 

Improving arm function after stroke using task-specific training

Many people who experience a stroke have difficulty moving their arm and hand, and research has shown that people can still have non-functional arms at 6 months after stroke. Our researchers are conducting a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial to test whether a programme of specific training exercises is more effective than usual care. We are seeking people with stroke who have difficulty using their arm and/or hand to take part in this study. The study will involve assessments of arm and hand function before and after a 6 week period, with a follow-up assessment after 6 months.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

There are currently no research projects listed for the Northern Territory. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

There are currently no research projects listed for the Northern Territory. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

The impact of negative illness perceptions on engagement in community rehabilitation activities in the chronic stroke population

Illness perceptions refer to a person's understanding, and beliefs regarding their condition and treatment. The research team are looking for people who have had a stroke over six months ago and live in the community to join the study. Suitable participants will be required to come to ACU health clinics for about 30 minutes to complete a short survey and two brief questionnaires to complete the screening process. They will then be provided an activity log in which they will be asked to record their exercise or rehabilitation activities on a daily basis, over a four-week period.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

The impact of negative illness perceptions on engagement in community rehabilitation activities in the chronic stroke population

Illness perceptions refer to a person's understanding, and beliefs regarding their condition and treatment. The research team are looking for people who have had a stroke over six months ago and live in the community to join the study. Suitable participants will be required to come to ACU health clinics for about 30 minutes to complete a short survey and two brief questionnaires to complete the screening process. They will then be provided an activity log in which they will be asked to record their exercise or rehabilitation activities on a daily basis, over a four-week period.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Can moderate levels of exercise improve brain function in people with stroke?

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether moderate intensity exercise can improve capacity for neuroplasticity in the brain, to support recovery after stroke. Participants will attend our neurorehabilitation clinic for a single session and be randomised to either an exercise or rest condition. Brain measures will be performed before and after exercise (or rest).

Find out more about the study

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

Find out more about the study

 

Evaluating a promising treatment for post-stroke depression

Around 50% of people who survive stroke experience post-stroke depression. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a safe and promising treatment that increases brain activity with electromagnetic pulses and can improve depression. This study aims to optimise rTMS therapy by identifying stroke characteristics that could be enable greater clinical benefit. People who are experiencing depression after stroke are encouraged to contact the research team. After being screened for safety, participants will have an MRI scan followed by 10 rTMS treatment sessions over two weeks.

Find out more about the study

 

Can restorative brain-computer interfaces improve hand motor functions after a stroke?

This study is investigating whether neurofeedback training can improve hand movement after stroke. Participation involves attending 20 sessions at the University of Adelaide, during which participants imagine they extend their fingers and receive actual finger extension via a bionic hand involved with their fingers. People who have had a stroke at least 6 months ago, are able to understand auditory commands presented in English, and are independently mobile are invited to take part.

Find out more about the study

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Can moderate levels of exercise improve brain function in people with stroke?

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether moderate intensity exercise can improve capacity for neuroplasticity in the brain, to support recovery after stroke. Participants will attend our neurorehabilitation clinic for a single session and be randomised to either an exercise or rest condition. Brain measures will be performed before and after exercise (or rest).

Find out more about the study

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

Find out more about the study

 

Evaluating a promising treatment for post-stroke depression

Around 50% of people who survive stroke experience post-stroke depression. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a safe and promising treatment that increases brain activity with electromagnetic pulses and can improve depression. This study aims to optimise rTMS therapy by identifying stroke characteristics that could be enable greater clinical benefit. People who are experiencing depression after stroke are encouraged to contact the research team. After being screened for safety, participants will have an MRI scan followed by 10 rTMS treatment sessions over two weeks.

Find out more about the study

 

Can restorative brain-computer interfaces improve hand motor functions after a stroke?

This study is investigating whether neurofeedback training can improve hand movement after stroke. Participation involves attending 20 sessions at the University of Adelaide, during which participants imagine they extend their fingers and receive actual finger extension via a bionic hand involved with their fingers. People who have had a stroke at least 6 months ago, are able to understand auditory commands presented in English, and are independently mobile are invited to take part.

Find out more about the study

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

PERsonalised Knowledge to reduce the risk of Stroke (PERKS-International)

This study is looking for people in Hobart who haven’t had a stroke, to compare two different ways of showing them their risk factors, which are things like diet, exercise and blood pressure. Knowing these lifestyle risk factors may help people to control them and reduce their risk of having a stroke. Participation will involve four online surveys and two face-to-face health checks.

Find out more about the study

 

Can a carer-supported exercise program, delivered in the home, improve exercise participation for people after stroke?  Part 1, Acceptability

The aim of the study is to investigate the acceptability of a carer-supported home based exercise program for stroke survivors, targeted at increasing physical activity levels. It also aims to collect exercise behaviour information, exercise preferences and enablers and barriers to exercise. Participants will be required to complete an online questionnaire which will take approximately 15 minutes. This can alternatively be completed over the phone if required.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

PERsonalised Knowledge to reduce the risk of Stroke (PERKS-International)

This study is looking for people in Hobart who haven’t had a stroke, to compare two different ways of showing them their risk factors, which are things like diet, exercise and blood pressure. Knowing these lifestyle risk factors may help people to control them and reduce their risk of having a stroke. Participation will involve four online surveys and two face-to-face health checks.

Find out more about the study

 

Can a carer-supported exercise program, delivered in the home, improve exercise participation for people after stroke?  Part 1, Acceptability

The aim of the study is to investigate the acceptability of a carer-supported home based exercise program for stroke survivors, targeted at increasing physical activity levels. It also aims to collect exercise behaviour information, exercise preferences and enablers and barriers to exercise. Participants will be required to complete an online questionnaire which will take approximately 15 minutes. This can alternatively be completed over the phone if required.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

ADaPT: Aphasia, Depression, and Psychological Treatment

Recruitment is continuing for this study, seeking expressions of interest from people with aphasia and low mood/depression after stroke. Research participants will take part in a 10-session intervention program delivered by a qualified clinical neuropsychologist, at no cost. Sessions will be individual, and either face-to-face in Melbourne (south-east suburb), or via telehealth, with a COVID-safe protocol.

Find out more about the study

 

PERsonalised Knowledge to reduce the risk of Stroke (PERKS-International)

This study is looking for people in Melbourne (Clayton) who haven’t had a stroke, to compare two different ways of showing them their risk factors, which are things like diet, exercise and blood pressure. Knowing these lifestyle risk factors may help people to control them and reduce their risk of having a stroke. Participation will involve four online surveys and two face-to-face health checks.

Find out more about the study

 

Co-design of a personalised physical activity intervention for stroke survivors

The aim of this study is to design a pathway to personalised, engaging and targeted physical activity programs for stroke survivors. Researchers working together with stroke survivors, carers and clinicians will “co-design” a new physical activity intervention, using an integrated knowledge translation approach, that will be tested in a future trial. Participants will be asked to join 1 or 2 workshops, either in person, or from home via phone or video.

Find out more about the study

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

Find out more about the study

 

Perispinal Etanercept to improve Stroke Outcomes (PESTO) clinical trial

Funded by the Federal Government through the Medical Research Future Fund, Australia’s first multi-centred international clinical trial of perispinal etanercept in chronic stroke is actively recruiting participants. This trial seeks to determine if perispinal etanercept improves quality of life in working age survivors of stroke with a moderate to severe disability, and if repeated treatments lead to more improvement compared to one treatment. Australian sites are located in Melbourne, Victoria. We understand that interstate travel is particularly challenging at the moment, and we take the time to ensure that anyone who is interested and eligible makes an informed decision about participating.

Find out more about the study

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

Find out more about the study

 

Hemispatial neglect, EEG correlates and the effect of blue wavelength light on spatial inattention

Those who survive a stroke often have difficulties paying attention to the world around them. While some people might get distracted a little more easily, others might seem to ignore the left-hand side of the world, for example only eat the food on the right-hand side of their plate. This is known as spatial neglect. To help us understand why this affects some people, we are looking for people who have experienced a stroke to complete a phone interview, and attend 1-2 sessions at  Monash University in Clayton for an EEG - a bit like a swimming cap that measures your brain activity.

Find out more about the study

 

Improving arm function after stroke using task-specific training

Many people who experience a stroke have difficulty moving their arm and hand, and research has shown that people can still have non-functional arms at 6 months after stroke. Our researchers are conducting a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial to test whether a programme of specific training exercises is more effective than usual care. We are seeking people with stroke who have difficulty using their arm and/or hand to take part in this study. The study will involve assessments of arm and hand function before and after a 6 week period, with a follow-up assessment after 6 months.

Find out more about the study

 

Improving wellbeing after acquired brain injury with a group program to enhance participation in valued activities

Have you had a stroke or acquired brain injury (ABI) that has affected how you think and feel? Are you interested in learning ways to deal with these changes so you can do more of the things you value in life? Difficulties with memory and other thinking skills, along with changes in mood, can affect the capacity to do things that are meaningful and valued, such as work, leisure and social activities. VaLiANT is an 8-week group program located at La Trobe University in Bundoora (VIC), or run via telehealth (Zoom videoconferencing) during periods of Covid-related restrictions. Adults (aged 18 years or over) who have had a stroke at least 3 months ago can participate. The program is designed to increase your participation in activities that you value while helping you learn strategies for dealing with changes in thinking and mood. You are invited to participate in our research investigating the impact of participating in the group on the lives of people with ABI.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

ADaPT: Aphasia, Depression, and Psychological Treatment

Recruitment is continuing for this study, seeking expressions of interest from people with aphasia and low mood/depression after stroke. Research participants will take part in a 10-session intervention program delivered by a qualified clinical neuropsychologist, at no cost. Sessions will be individual, and either face-to-face in Melbourne (south-east suburb), or via telehealth, with a COVID-safe protocol.

Find out more about the study

 

PERsonalised Knowledge to reduce the risk of Stroke (PERKS-International)

This study is looking for people in Melbourne (Clayton) who haven’t had a stroke, to compare two different ways of showing them their risk factors, which are things like diet, exercise and blood pressure. Knowing these lifestyle risk factors may help people to control them and reduce their risk of having a stroke. Participation will involve four online surveys and two face-to-face health checks.

Find out more about the study

 

Co-design of a personalised physical activity intervention for stroke survivors

The aim of this study is to design a pathway to personalised, engaging and targeted physical activity programs for stroke survivors. Researchers working together with stroke survivors, carers and clinicians will “co-design” a new physical activity intervention, using an integrated knowledge translation approach, that will be tested in a future trial. Participants will be asked to join 1 or 2 workshops, either in person, or from home via phone or video.

Find out more about the study

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

Find out more about the study

 

Perispinal Etanercept to improve Stroke Outcomes (PESTO) clinical trial

Funded by the Federal Government through the Medical Research Future Fund, Australia’s first multi-centred international clinical trial of perispinal etanercept in chronic stroke is actively recruiting participants. This trial seeks to determine if perispinal etanercept improves quality of life in working age survivors of stroke with a moderate to severe disability, and if repeated treatments lead to more improvement compared to one treatment. Australian sites are located in Melbourne, Victoria. We understand that interstate travel is particularly challenging at the moment, and we take the time to ensure that anyone who is interested and eligible makes an informed decision about participating.

Find out more about the study

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

Find out more about the study

 

Hemispatial neglect, EEG correlates and the effect of blue wavelength light on spatial inattention

Those who survive a stroke often have difficulties paying attention to the world around them. While some people might get distracted a little more easily, others might seem to ignore the left-hand side of the world, for example only eat the food on the right-hand side of their plate. This is known as spatial neglect. To help us understand why this affects some people, we are looking for people who have experienced a stroke to complete a phone interview, and attend 1-2 sessions at  Monash University in Clayton for an EEG - a bit like a swimming cap that measures your brain activity.

Find out more about the study

 

Improving arm function after stroke using task-specific training

Many people who experience a stroke have difficulty moving their arm and hand, and research has shown that people can still have non-functional arms at 6 months after stroke. Our researchers are conducting a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial to test whether a programme of specific training exercises is more effective than usual care. We are seeking people with stroke who have difficulty using their arm and/or hand to take part in this study. The study will involve assessments of arm and hand function before and after a 6 week period, with a follow-up assessment after 6 months.

Find out more about the study

 

Improving wellbeing after acquired brain injury with a group program to enhance participation in valued activities

Have you had a stroke or acquired brain injury (ABI) that has affected how you think and feel? Are you interested in learning ways to deal with these changes so you can do more of the things you value in life? Difficulties with memory and other thinking skills, along with changes in mood, can affect the capacity to do things that are meaningful and valued, such as work, leisure and social activities. VaLiANT is an 8-week group program located at La Trobe University in Bundoora (VIC), or run via telehealth (Zoom videoconferencing) during periods of Covid-related restrictions. Adults (aged 18 years or over) who have had a stroke at least 3 months ago can participate. The program is designed to increase your participation in activities that you value while helping you learn strategies for dealing with changes in thinking and mood. You are invited to participate in our research investigating the impact of participating in the group on the lives of people with ABI.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Pilot study of a group therapy program for individuals with emotion dysregulation after an acquired brain injury

Following a brain injury, there are many reasons that you may have difficulty regulating your emotions, including injury to emotion centres in the brain and/or due to the effect of major life changes you have experienced as a result of your injury. The ER-ABI group program will introduce a range of strategies to help you to better understand and regulate your emotions. The group is designed for people who have sustained an acquired brain injury in the last 24 months (at the time of commencement of the group). Each group consists of eight weekly two-hour sessions and one follow-up session.

Find out more about the study

 

Stroke survivors and carers' experiences of modified constraint-induced movement therapy in an early-supported discharge rehabilitation service

Constraint-induced movement therapy is strongly recommended by Stroke Foundation for stroke survivors to receive as part of their arm rehabilitation after stroke. This study aims to understand the experiences of stroke survivors and carers who have received or supported this therapy through one-on-one interviews. The researchers are seeking a stroke survivor and a carer of a stroke survivor to partner in our study to review the research themes and help share the study findings.

Find out more about the study

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

Find out more about the study

 

The relationship between thinking skills and daily functioning in adults with brain injuries

The University of Western Australia is researching how thinking skills following a brain injury like stroke affect how well people can do things such as work or hobbies. Participants will need to attend the University of Western Australia in Perth to have an assessment and complete questionnaires and tests, and attend a follow-up in three months’ time. Case managers or partners will also be invited to participate. A report about how participants went can be provided on request.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Pilot study of a group therapy program for individuals with emotion dysregulation after an acquired brain injury

Following a brain injury, there are many reasons that you may have difficulty regulating your emotions, including injury to emotion centres in the brain and/or due to the effect of major life changes you have experienced as a result of your injury. The ER-ABI group program will introduce a range of strategies to help you to better understand and regulate your emotions. The group is designed for people who have sustained an acquired brain injury in the last 24 months (at the time of commencement of the group). Each group consists of eight weekly two-hour sessions and one follow-up session.

Find out more about the study

 

Stroke survivors and carers' experiences of modified constraint-induced movement therapy in an early-supported discharge rehabilitation service

Constraint-induced movement therapy is strongly recommended by Stroke Foundation for stroke survivors to receive as part of their arm rehabilitation after stroke. This study aims to understand the experiences of stroke survivors and carers who have received or supported this therapy through one-on-one interviews. The researchers are seeking a stroke survivor and a carer of a stroke survivor to partner in our study to review the research themes and help share the study findings.

Find out more about the study

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

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The relationship between thinking skills and daily functioning in adults with brain injuries

The University of Western Australia is researching how thinking skills following a brain injury like stroke affect how well people can do things such as work or hobbies. Participants will need to attend the University of Western Australia in Perth to have an assessment and complete questionnaires and tests, and attend a follow-up in three months’ time. Case managers or partners will also be invited to participate. A report about how participants went can be provided on request.

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Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.