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Meet some of our volunteers

Hien Le – Queensland - volunteering since 2014

henry1

How long have you been volunteering at the NSF?
I have been a NSF Volunteer for the past 1.5 years

Why did you decide to volunteer at the NSF?
Stroke was brought upon my family unexpectedly in 2014, no warning at all and at that time us having very limited knowledge of what a Stroke is and what is involved. I reached out for help and there was NSF to welcome me and look after me. I love being a Volunteer and volunteering for numerous organisations for over 20 years now, I did not hesitate to ask and insisted to NSF to become a Volunteer for their brilliant organisation. I wanted to do whatever I could to help make sure that no-one else has to go through what I did, whilst spreading the knowledge and awareness of Stroke! 

What type of things do you do as a volunteer?
I am happy to help wherever possible and needed! I have been everywhere - starting out in the Brisbane Office and meeting and working closely with the lovely Brisbane team, assisting with our Programs including Know Your Numbers, StrokeSafe Speakers and general Stroke Research. I have also been out and around Brisbane, helping out at the annual National Stroke Week which I have done a few times now to Australia's Biggest Blood Pressure Check. I am greatly looking forward to volunteering at numerous other future events, and at all times continuing the fight and advocating to #FightStroke!

What has been the highlight of your volunteer journey to date? 
There have been so many highlights of my NSF Volunteer journey so far and I know that there will be many, many more highlights to come! But if I had to name THE highlight so far, seriously it has to be the moment when I officially became a NSF Volunteer. I simply knew that I needed to be a NSF Volunteer, and am very grateful and appreciative for this opportunity. Thank you!

Pamela Bull – Victoria – volunteering since 2011
pamela

How long have you been volunteering at the NSF?
I have been volunteering at the NSF for the last 5 years.

Why did you decide to volunteer at the NSF?
After retiring from nearly 40 years as a nurse and midwife, I felt that I could contribute some firsthand knowledge and experiences.
I responded to an article in the National Seniors magazine asking for expressions of interest to join the newly established team of StrokeSafe ambassadors.
I had seen many people have Strokes, including my mother and felt this was a purposeful and rewarding way of contributing to the community in a positive way.

What type of things do you do as a volunteer?
As a volunteer, I visit community groups about once a month to give the NSF StrokeSafe presentation which is co-ordinated through the NSF.
The presentation and time spent with each group is about 1-2 hours, including questions, informal chats and often a cup of tea!

What has been the highlight of your volunteer journey to date?
These presentations are always inspirational – I have met such a variety of people over the last 5 years – all have ‘a story’ to share and are extremely grateful for this visit. Often people tell me that this was the best talk they had ever attended.

Of course this could not happen without the help and support of the professional staff at NSF.

One highlight I cherish is when I gave a talk to a group of retired Seamen, just after Anzac day. I happened to mention that I had made over 100 of the poppies which covered Princes Bridge and Federation Square – I had a standing ovation then and at the completion of the presentation.
I look forward to meeting many more groups in the future.

Tracey Arendse – Victoria – volunteering since 2016


How long have you been volunteering at the Stroke Foundation?

Since July 2016

Why did you decide to volunteer at the Stroke Foundation?
In October 2013 I had two strokes, during recovery from a Thyroidectomy at The Royal Melbourne Hospital. I had resigned from my previous employment because of having an overactive thyroid, and hadn’t worked since. This year I had been given the go-ahead to start working again and applied to volunteer on reception at the Stroke Foundation because I wasn’t sure of my capabilities post-stroke, but felt I had previous experience that I could build on in the capacity as a receptionist. I was just really looking forward to being back in the office environment and working with other people again.

What types of things do you do in your volunteer role?
I answer the phones, redirect calls, welcome visitors and other various admin tasks as needed.

What has been your highlight to date?
There have been many highlights; supporting the Gifts in Wills team with some data entry, supporting Marisa with the NSW StrokeSafe program as an admin assistant and meeting other volunteers.

 

Marielle Jones - Victorian – volunteering since 2016



How long have you been volunteering at the Stroke Foundation?

I started at the Stroke Foundation in July 2016, so just around three months now.

Why did you decide to volunteer at the Stroke Foundation?

Seeing the considerable impact of stroke, how common it is and the importance of knowing the early signs of stroke are, I think it’s a great foundation to volunteer for. My father experienced a TIA, the GP said he was fine but my mother recognised the early signs and took him to the emergency department which then led to diagnosing and treating a carotid artery dissection. We were lucky this early intervention made the impact minimal. Being a student at the moment I’m also lucky to have more spare time to be able to volunteer.

What type of things do you do as a volunteer?
I have been helping the lovely Profile and Reputation team with StrokeSafe presentations administration. I’m also currently lending a hand with Stroke Week administration such as mailing out resources.

What has been the highlight of your volunteer journey to date?

Seeing all the hard work and passion that goes behind each project that is undertaken by the Stroke Foundation. Especially the StrokeSafe Ambassadors that give so much of their time to give presentations and spread the word.

 

Lorraine Walker – Tasmania – volunteering since 2013


How long have you been volunteering at the Stroke Foundation?
I have been volunteering for about three to four years now.

Why did you decide to volunteer at the Stroke Foundation?
There are several reasons - 1. I retired after nearly 50 years of nursing which included many years in an Intensive care Unit where I often had stroke patients under my care. 2. I have a particular interest in both neurological and neurosurgical nursing, with a post-graduate focus in that field, and 3. I have both a mother and a daughter who have had strokes (even my dog had a stroke!), so my family history is a huge risk for me.

What type of things do you do as a volunteer?
I am a StrokeSafe Ambassador, and I present the StrokeSafe education talks to community, church, focus and social groups - basically to anyone who will listen.

What has been the highlight of your volunteer journey to date?
After a StrokeSafe presentation, I love seeing people leave, after a StrokeSafe presentation, with a firm determination to do something about their own lifestyle that may be putting them at risk, as well as being so much better informed about what they can do if they suspect someone else is having a stroke. Being invited back twice by two separate organisations to present StrokeSafe education again says to me that people are keen to share the news that strokes are preventable.

 

Claudia Marazita – Victoria – volunteering since 2016



How long have you been volunteering at the Stroke Foundation?
For three months now, and I've loved every minute of it!

Why did you decide to volunteer at the Stroke Foundation?
I have a personal connection to stroke as my grandfather suffered from one and lived with its consequences for six years.

I thought volunteering would be a great way to contribute to what I know to be such a worthy cause and feeling as though I could give back to a cause that has had an impact on my family.

What type of things do you do as a volunteer?
I volunteer at head office one day a week assisting the volunteer coordinators and the wider People and Culture team with administrative duties.

What has been the highlight of your volunteer journey to date?

Definitely making new friends :)