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None currently in the ACT

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

None currently in the ACT

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

NDIS Evaluation, Older People Study

As part of an evaluation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), we want to find out if the NDIS is making a difference to older people with disability. The main aim of the Older People Study is to understand what supports NDIS participants are getting compared to older people with disability who are not part of the NDIS.

Find out more about the study

Aerobic exercise and task-specific training to enhance upper limb recovery after stroke – Newcastle

This project will investigate the effect of combining task-specific training and aerobic exercise training to improve arm function after stroke. Participants will attend the University of Newcastle 3 times per week for 1 hour of hand training and aerobic exercise training for 10 weeks. They will also have their hand function measured four times over a six month period.

Contact Sarah Valkenborghs (02) 4042 0819 or Sarah.Valkenborghs@uon.edu.au

Combined Physical and Sensory training (COMPoSE) to improve arm function after stroke

Following stroke, it is common for survivors to be left with limited ability to use their arm for everyday tasks and function. This research based in the Hunter area of NSW aims to:

(a) Assess the usefulness a new method of training (combining practice of both movement and feeling) on arm function and impairment following a stroke.

(b) Provide initial evidence to show whether this new method of training could be effective.

The study will result in the collection of initial evidence which will be used in further research into the development of more effective methods of therapy to improve upper limb function following 


Mapping and recovery of arm coordination after stroke 

An important problem after stroke is an inability to coordinate arm movements.  This project aims to identify which type of stroke causes coordination deficits of arm movements and to track and explore mechanisms of recovery over two years.

The study will result in new knowledge to increase understanding of recovery of coordination after stroke that will help to design new treatments to improve coordination of arm movement.

The researchers are seeking people whose arm movement has been affected by stroke.

Participants will attend the Calvary Hospital in Newcastle three times for an MRI. They will also attend the Hunter Medical Research Institute three times for arm movement measurement.  Participation will take place over a two year period. Assistance is available with travel and parking costs.

Contact Professor Paulette van Vliet on 02 4921 7833 or paulette.vanvliet@newcastle.edu.au .


A comparative open label study comparing the efficacy of structured physiotherapy vs non structured physiotherapy in reducing post-stroke spasticity related shoulder pain in patients treated with Botulinum toxin A

This research study will examine whether it is possible to reduce the stiffness or tightness of the shoulder muscles by:

  • Giving botulinum toxin injections into the shoulder muscles, or
  • Combining botulinum toxin injections with structured exercises (physiotherapy).

Participants will need to attend the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney NSW.

For more information, contact the Outpatient Rehabilitation Department at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital on 02 9515 9889 and speak to Ms Sally BaileySally.Bailey@sswahs.nsw.gov.au or Dr Jaya Ganesh

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

NDIS Evaluation, Older People Study

As part of an evaluation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), we want to find out if the NDIS is making a difference to older people with disability. The main aim of the Older People Study is to understand what supports NDIS participants are getting compared to older people with disability who are not part of the NDIS.

Find out more about the study

Aerobic exercise and task-specific training to enhance upper limb recovery after stroke – Newcastle

This project will investigate the effect of combining task-specific training and aerobic exercise training to improve arm function after stroke. Participants will attend the University of Newcastle 3 times per week for 1 hour of hand training and aerobic exercise training for 10 weeks. They will also have their hand function measured four times over a six month period.

Contact Sarah Valkenborghs (02) 4042 0819 or Sarah.Valkenborghs@uon.edu.au

Combined Physical and Sensory training (COMPoSE) to improve arm function after stroke

Following stroke, it is common for survivors to be left with limited ability to use their arm for everyday tasks and function. This research based in the Hunter area of NSW aims to:

(a) Assess the usefulness a new method of training (combining practice of both movement and feeling) on arm function and impairment following a stroke.

(b) Provide initial evidence to show whether this new method of training could be effective.

The study will result in the collection of initial evidence which will be used in further research into the development of more effective methods of therapy to improve upper limb function following 


Mapping and recovery of arm coordination after stroke 

An important problem after stroke is an inability to coordinate arm movements.  This project aims to identify which type of stroke causes coordination deficits of arm movements and to track and explore mechanisms of recovery over two years.

The study will result in new knowledge to increase understanding of recovery of coordination after stroke that will help to design new treatments to improve coordination of arm movement.

The researchers are seeking people whose arm movement has been affected by stroke.

Participants will attend the Calvary Hospital in Newcastle three times for an MRI. They will also attend the Hunter Medical Research Institute three times for arm movement measurement.  Participation will take place over a two year period. Assistance is available with travel and parking costs.

Contact Professor Paulette van Vliet on 02 4921 7833 or paulette.vanvliet@newcastle.edu.au .


A comparative open label study comparing the efficacy of structured physiotherapy vs non structured physiotherapy in reducing post-stroke spasticity related shoulder pain in patients treated with Botulinum toxin A

This research study will examine whether it is possible to reduce the stiffness or tightness of the shoulder muscles by:

  • Giving botulinum toxin injections into the shoulder muscles, or
  • Combining botulinum toxin injections with structured exercises (physiotherapy).

Participants will need to attend the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney NSW.

For more information, contact the Outpatient Rehabilitation Department at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital on 02 9515 9889 and speak to Ms Sally BaileySally.Bailey@sswahs.nsw.gov.au or Dr Jaya Ganesh

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

NDIS Evaluation, Older People Study

As part of an evaluation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), we want to find out if the NDIS is making a difference to older people with disability. The main aim of the Older People Study is to understand what supports NDIS participants are getting compared to older people with disability who are not part of the NDIS.

Find out more about the study

Associated reaction measurement study

People with stroke or other acquired brain injury may experience associated reactions, which are unwanted movements in their arms while walking or exerting effort, leading to awkward arm postures. This study is seeking participants to help develop an assessment of associated reactions while walking, and to determine the main impairments that contribute to it.

Find out more about the study

The use of telehealth methods in neuropsychology following stroke

Researchers from Monash University are interested in researching new ways to help identify stroke survivors who are experiencing cognitive difficulties so that they can access appropriate rehabilitation.

This research involves two three-hour sessions at Monash University Clayton. One conducted in-person and one conducted over videoconference. In each session, participants will complete a series of tasks to assess different aspects of their thinking (e.g., memory). Participants will be provided with a one-page summary or their results. Note that you do not need to be experiencing cognitive difficulties to participate in this study.

To register or get more information contact Jodie Chapman via email (jodie.chapman@monash.edu) or phone (0401 148 123)

Explanatory statement for the project (PDF, 101 KB)

Participants required for research exploring techniques to improve memory following stroke

Monash University School of Psychological Sciences is seeking adult stroke survivors who are experiencing memory problems to participate in a new exciting study exploring techniques to improve memory function.

Participation will involve the completion of either a 6-week computer training program OR 6-week memory skills training group. To be eligible you will need to have basic computer proficiency and internet access AND be able to attend memory group sessions in Notting Hill, Melbourne in person. These rehabilitation programs will be provided free of charge.

For further details, or if you are interested in participating, please contact Toni at toni.withiel@monash.edu or by calling 0411729045. View the study advert for participants for more information.

Improving the wellbeing of older carers 

The National Ageing Research Institute (NARI) is investigating ways of improving the wellbeing of older carers. We need volunteers aged 55+, living at home with someone aged 60+ who they provide care for due to health concerns.

Participation takes place at home. NARI can involve volunteers who live within two hours drive of the Melbourne CBD.

Participation takes place over one year. During the first six months, participants receive one of the following:

  • Home-based exercise program individually tailored by a physiotherapist
  • Social visits at home for friendly conversation
  • Usual care

Contact Edwina McCarthy: 8387 2315  or e.mccarthy@nari.unimelb.edu.au

Click here for more.

The Use of Smartphones following Stroke

Monash University’s School of Psychological Sciences is seeking adult stroke survivors who have no history of any other neurological condition to participate in this study exploring the experiences of and attitudes towards the use of smartphones in stroke survivors.

The study involves a survey about your experiences with and attitudes toward smartphones, as well as several brief questionnaires assessing your emotional state, your level of functioning in daily life and two brief cognitive assessments including a memory task. These can be completed over the phone, at your home, or at Monash University in Clayton. Participation is expected to take about ninety minutes.

Participants will go into the draw to win an iPod shuffle. Please see the attached participant information sheet for more information: Monash Uni study explanatory statement

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

NDIS Evaluation, Older People Study

As part of an evaluation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), we want to find out if the NDIS is making a difference to older people with disability. The main aim of the Older People Study is to understand what supports NDIS participants are getting compared to older people with disability who are not part of the NDIS.

Find out more about the study

Associated reaction measurement study

People with stroke or other acquired brain injury may experience associated reactions, which are unwanted movements in their arms while walking or exerting effort, leading to awkward arm postures. This study is seeking participants to help develop an assessment of associated reactions while walking, and to determine the main impairments that contribute to it.

Find out more about the study

The use of telehealth methods in neuropsychology following stroke

Researchers from Monash University are interested in researching new ways to help identify stroke survivors who are experiencing cognitive difficulties so that they can access appropriate rehabilitation.

This research involves two three-hour sessions at Monash University Clayton. One conducted in-person and one conducted over videoconference. In each session, participants will complete a series of tasks to assess different aspects of their thinking (e.g., memory). Participants will be provided with a one-page summary or their results. Note that you do not need to be experiencing cognitive difficulties to participate in this study.

To register or get more information contact Jodie Chapman via email (jodie.chapman@monash.edu) or phone (0401 148 123)

Explanatory statement for the project (PDF, 101 KB)

Participants required for research exploring techniques to improve memory following stroke

Monash University School of Psychological Sciences is seeking adult stroke survivors who are experiencing memory problems to participate in a new exciting study exploring techniques to improve memory function.

Participation will involve the completion of either a 6-week computer training program OR 6-week memory skills training group. To be eligible you will need to have basic computer proficiency and internet access AND be able to attend memory group sessions in Notting Hill, Melbourne in person. These rehabilitation programs will be provided free of charge.

For further details, or if you are interested in participating, please contact Toni at toni.withiel@monash.edu or by calling 0411729045. View the study advert for participants for more information.

Improving the wellbeing of older carers 

The National Ageing Research Institute (NARI) is investigating ways of improving the wellbeing of older carers. We need volunteers aged 55+, living at home with someone aged 60+ who they provide care for due to health concerns.

Participation takes place at home. NARI can involve volunteers who live within two hours drive of the Melbourne CBD.

Participation takes place over one year. During the first six months, participants receive one of the following:

  • Home-based exercise program individually tailored by a physiotherapist
  • Social visits at home for friendly conversation
  • Usual care

Contact Edwina McCarthy: 8387 2315  or e.mccarthy@nari.unimelb.edu.au

Click here for more.

The Use of Smartphones following Stroke

Monash University’s School of Psychological Sciences is seeking adult stroke survivors who have no history of any other neurological condition to participate in this study exploring the experiences of and attitudes towards the use of smartphones in stroke survivors.

The study involves a survey about your experiences with and attitudes toward smartphones, as well as several brief questionnaires assessing your emotional state, your level of functioning in daily life and two brief cognitive assessments including a memory task. These can be completed over the phone, at your home, or at Monash University in Clayton. Participation is expected to take about ninety minutes.

Participants will go into the draw to win an iPod shuffle. Please see the attached participant information sheet for more information: Monash Uni study explanatory statement

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Health professionals' perspectives on the impact of fatigue on lifestyle changes for secondary stroke prevention (research)

Toni Heinemann is undertaking research on the impact of fatigue for stroke survivors on engagement in lifestyle changes for secondary stroke prevention. The purpose of this research is to explore health professionals’ experiences, perceptions and views on working with stroke survivors and the impact of fatigue and self-management.

Toni is currently seeking health professionals (OT's, Physiotherapists and nurses) working with stroke survivors in their daily practice in WA who have three or more years’ experience in the field. Volunteers will be asked to assist with this research by agreeing to participate in an interview with Toni, which will take approximately one hour.

If you are interesting in assisting with this research, please read the attached information sheet and consent form for further information on the research and contact the primary researcher Toni Heinemann via email hein0100@flinders.edu.au or telephone 0401 374 722.

Information sheet (DOC 232 KB)
 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Health professionals' perspectives on the impact of fatigue on lifestyle changes for secondary stroke prevention (research)

Toni Heinemann is undertaking research on the impact of fatigue for stroke survivors on engagement in lifestyle changes for secondary stroke prevention. The purpose of this research is to explore health professionals’ experiences, perceptions and views on working with stroke survivors and the impact of fatigue and self-management.

Toni is currently seeking health professionals (OT's, Physiotherapists and nurses) working with stroke survivors in their daily practice in WA who have three or more years’ experience in the field. Volunteers will be asked to assist with this research by agreeing to participate in an interview with Toni, which will take approximately one hour.

If you are interesting in assisting with this research, please read the attached information sheet and consent form for further information on the research and contact the primary researcher Toni Heinemann via email hein0100@flinders.edu.au or telephone 0401 374 722.

Information sheet (DOC 232 KB)
 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

 Stroke survivors’ perspective on their recovery journey: the rural and remote northwest Queensland experience 

The aim of this study is to explore the rural and remote stroke survivor's perspective on their recovery. Stroke survivors who have or are living, working or travelling in northwest Queensland are invited to participate in an interview or focus group which will last approximately one hour. To find out more about the study or to register your interest in participating, please contact the research team on 07 4745 4500 or email MICRRHstroke@jcu.edu.au

Download information sheet here.

Determining the Nature and Extent of Prospective Memory Impairment After Stroke

Have you ever intended to get milk on the way home, only to arrive home without milk? Prospective Memory (PM) is used when you want to remember to do something in the future. Does this type of memory change after stroke? Can it be improved post-stroke? These are the questions the current study aims to answer. This will be done by assessing and comparing the results of both individuals with stroke and neurologically healthy controls on multiple cognitive and PM measures. Firstly, to see PM is impaired post-stroke and secondly, if PM can be improved using a simple memory tool.

Download the flyer here.

 Stroke survivors’ perspective on their recovery journey: the rural and remote northwest Queensland experience 

The aim of this study is to explore the rural and remote stroke survivor's perspective on their recovery. Stroke survivors who have or are living, working or travelling in northwest Queensland are invited to participate in an interview or focus group which will last approximately one hour. To find out more about the study or to register your interest in participating, please contact the research team on 07 4745 4500 or email MICRRHstroke@jcu.edu.au

Download information sheet here.

Determining the Nature and Extent of Prospective Memory Impairment After Stroke

Have you ever intended to get milk on the way home, only to arrive home without milk? Prospective Memory (PM) is used when you want to remember to do something in the future. Does this type of memory change after stroke? Can it be improved post-stroke? These are the questions the current study aims to answer. This will be done by assessing and comparing the results of both individuals with stroke and neurologically healthy controls on multiple cognitive and PM measures. Firstly, to see PM is impaired post-stroke and secondly, if PM can be improved using a simple memory tool.

Download the flyer here.

NDIS Evaluation, Older People Study

As part of an evaluation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), we want to find out if the NDIS is making a difference to older people with disability. The main aim of the Older People Study is to understand what supports NDIS participants are getting compared to older people with disability who are not part of the NDIS.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

NDIS Evaluation, Older People Study

As part of an evaluation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), we want to find out if the NDIS is making a difference to older people with disability. The main aim of the Older People Study is to understand what supports NDIS participants are getting compared to older people with disability who are not part of the NDIS.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Hyperlipidaemia (high cholesterol) patient preference elicitation study

The aim of this study is to develop a greater understanding of treatment preferences of people with raised cholesterol, including those who have previously suffered a stroke or heart attack. Participation in the study involves completing a 20 minute online survey.

Find out more about the study

Tangible interaction with everyday objects for home-based upper-limb stroke rehabilitation

This online questionnaire will help to understand the activities people take part in at home, to help develop design prototypes for everyday devices such as radios and lamps that can be used by stroke survivors and will help with their rehabilitation. The survey will take approximately 10–15 minutes to complete.

Find out more about the study

Emerging treatments for stroke survey
 
This research project will measure stroke survivor’s interest, understanding and expectations about a range of emerging stem cell treatments for stroke. Participants will complete a survey via telephone, mail, or online. The survey will take between 30-60 minutes to complete.
 
Contact David Unsworth 08 8313 3452 or email david.unsworth@adelaide.edu.au.

Telehealth delivery of memory rehabilitation following stroke

Compensatory memory rehabilitation has been shown to improve everyday memory. However, for many stroke survivors, access to rehab services is a challenge.

This study aims to establish the effectiveness of memory rehabilitation, delivered in-person and over the internet, making it the first study of its kind to investigate internet delivery for stroke survivors with memory difficulties.

If you would like further information please contact David Lawson on david.lawson@monash.edu

Expression of interest for young stroke survivor or carer of young stroke survivor research

Are you are a young stroke survivor, or a carer of a young survivor, and would you like to be contacted when the possibility of research participation arises?

If so, please contact Barbara Wolfenden on barbara.wolfenden@florey.edu.au to register your interest.

Expression of interest form (PDF)

Improving Communicative Fitness: Can a smart phone rehabilitation app increase talking time and community participation for people with post-stroke aphasia?

The aim of this study is to see if people with aphasia are able to increase their talk time using a phone app called CommFit, and if more talking practice leads to better language and social outcomes. They also want to know people with aphasia's opinions on the app- whether it is easy to use, whether it helps aphasia, etc.

People with aphasia will be asked to use the CommFit app and wear a small accelerometer (measures vibration) on their collarbone for 5 weeks. They will be asked to increase their talking. They will also have their language assessed and take part in interviews on their opinions of the app.

People who complete the 5 week study will be given $150.

If you are interested in helping them to test the app, but don't want to do the 5 weeks, you can use the app for 1 week and complete an interview on your opinions. This 1 week study pays $20.

Download flyer here.

Survey of preference for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke

Investigators:
Dr. Feng Wang, A/Prof. Bruce C.V. Campbell, Prof. Stephen M. Davis,A/Prof. Bernard Yan

The Melbourne Brain Centre at the Royal Melbourne Hospital would like to invite stroke survivors, carers, family members and friends to participate in a survey focused on the preference for selection criteria of acute stroke treatment (also termed clot retrieval which is a way to remove clots in blocked brain arteries). Recent trials of clot retrieval for acute ischemic stroke demonstrated superior benefit of clot retrieval compared with intravenous thrombolysis alone when there is a major vessel occlusion. However, it remains unknown, which selection criteria should be used to select those patients. In this survey, we sought to evaluate the preferences for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke.  The results of the survey may inform decision-making and selection for clot retrieval.

The following instructions can guide you to complete the questionnaire step by step:

1. Please go to the questionnaire URL:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QK8LHQ8

2. Read the web-version questionnaire.

3. Complete the questions.

4. Press “Submit” bottom.

Constraint Induced or Multi-Modal aphasia rehabilitation (COMPARE): An RCT for stroke related chronic aphasia

COMPARE is a national research study which compares the outcomes of different treatments for people with aphasia. This study will determine if two contrasting treatments will result in better outcomes for people with aphasia, compared to the usual speech pathology treatments. This trial will be running in various locations in Victoria, Western Australia, New South Wales, Queensland and Tasmania.

Associate Professor Miranda Rose, La Trobe University,  compareaphasia@latrobe.edu.au 
Website: www.latrobe.edu.au/compare

Free support program for stroke survivors and carers

Have you had a stroke or are you caring for someone who has?

This 8 week program aims to help you:

  •     Develop strategies for managing symptoms and connecting with services.
  •     Identify your strengths and abilities
  •     Make goals and respond to change
  •     Create actionable plans that help you feel safe and happy

The support program is conducted one-on-one with a professional healthcare professional. It can be completed face-to-face (Melbourne) or over the phone (national).

This program is a part of a collaborative evidence-based research program run by St Vincent’s Hospital, the Australian Catholic University and the University of Melbourne.   

Contact Zoe Jenkins during office hours on 03 9231 3779 or ohp@svha.org.au

Older carers and mental wellbeing

The research project investigates the link between older carers’ physical activity and mental wellbeing. The research outcomes will improve the understanding of older carers' health needs and future designs of activity programs for older carers. Participants will be asked to complete a 15-minute survey online or on paper about their physical health, mood states and levels of physical activity. More information can be found in the Information Letter or by contacting Chenhong Xu on chenhong.xu@myacu.edu.au

Click here for more.

 

Pain in Stroke Study: RECOGNISE

The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health are conducting an online research project investigating pain in stroke. The project involves answering a questionnaire and performing 4 interactive tasks regarding body ownership and recognition. The success of this project relies on recruiting large numbers of participants with and without stroke. We invite everyone over 18 to participate. Participation is easy and should take between 15 and 25 minutes, and is done entirely online. You do not need to give any personal information to participate.

Click here for more. 

This will take you straight to the information sheet, where you can read more about the project, and agree to participate if you wish.

If you would like any further details, please feel free to contact Brendon Haslam directly brendon.h@cliftonhillphysiotherapy.com.au 

 

Join the Communication Research Registry

The Communication Research Registry is a national register of people who would like to be involved in communication research. This includes research that looks into speech and language difficulties post stroke. People with communication difficulties, their family and friends and members of the public are invited to join. Click here.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Hyperlipidaemia (high cholesterol) patient preference elicitation study

The aim of this study is to develop a greater understanding of treatment preferences of people with raised cholesterol, including those who have previously suffered a stroke or heart attack. Participation in the study involves completing a 20 minute online survey.

Find out more about the study

Tangible interaction with everyday objects for home-based upper-limb stroke rehabilitation

This online questionnaire will help to understand the activities people take part in at home, to help develop design prototypes for everyday devices such as radios and lamps that can be used by stroke survivors and will help with their rehabilitation. The survey will take approximately 10–15 minutes to complete.

Find out more about the study

Emerging treatments for stroke survey
 
This research project will measure stroke survivor’s interest, understanding and expectations about a range of emerging stem cell treatments for stroke. Participants will complete a survey via telephone, mail, or online. The survey will take between 30-60 minutes to complete.
 
Contact David Unsworth 08 8313 3452 or email david.unsworth@adelaide.edu.au.

Telehealth delivery of memory rehabilitation following stroke

Compensatory memory rehabilitation has been shown to improve everyday memory. However, for many stroke survivors, access to rehab services is a challenge.

This study aims to establish the effectiveness of memory rehabilitation, delivered in-person and over the internet, making it the first study of its kind to investigate internet delivery for stroke survivors with memory difficulties.

If you would like further information please contact David Lawson on david.lawson@monash.edu

Expression of interest for young stroke survivor or carer of young stroke survivor research

Are you are a young stroke survivor, or a carer of a young survivor, and would you like to be contacted when the possibility of research participation arises?

If so, please contact Barbara Wolfenden on barbara.wolfenden@florey.edu.au to register your interest.

Expression of interest form (PDF)

Improving Communicative Fitness: Can a smart phone rehabilitation app increase talking time and community participation for people with post-stroke aphasia?

The aim of this study is to see if people with aphasia are able to increase their talk time using a phone app called CommFit, and if more talking practice leads to better language and social outcomes. They also want to know people with aphasia's opinions on the app- whether it is easy to use, whether it helps aphasia, etc.

People with aphasia will be asked to use the CommFit app and wear a small accelerometer (measures vibration) on their collarbone for 5 weeks. They will be asked to increase their talking. They will also have their language assessed and take part in interviews on their opinions of the app.

People who complete the 5 week study will be given $150.

If you are interested in helping them to test the app, but don't want to do the 5 weeks, you can use the app for 1 week and complete an interview on your opinions. This 1 week study pays $20.

Download flyer here.

Survey of preference for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke

Investigators:
Dr. Feng Wang, A/Prof. Bruce C.V. Campbell, Prof. Stephen M. Davis,A/Prof. Bernard Yan

The Melbourne Brain Centre at the Royal Melbourne Hospital would like to invite stroke survivors, carers, family members and friends to participate in a survey focused on the preference for selection criteria of acute stroke treatment (also termed clot retrieval which is a way to remove clots in blocked brain arteries). Recent trials of clot retrieval for acute ischemic stroke demonstrated superior benefit of clot retrieval compared with intravenous thrombolysis alone when there is a major vessel occlusion. However, it remains unknown, which selection criteria should be used to select those patients. In this survey, we sought to evaluate the preferences for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke.  The results of the survey may inform decision-making and selection for clot retrieval.

The following instructions can guide you to complete the questionnaire step by step:

1. Please go to the questionnaire URL:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QK8LHQ8

2. Read the web-version questionnaire.

3. Complete the questions.

4. Press “Submit” bottom.

Constraint Induced or Multi-Modal aphasia rehabilitation (COMPARE): An RCT for stroke related chronic aphasia

COMPARE is a national research study which compares the outcomes of different treatments for people with aphasia. This study will determine if two contrasting treatments will result in better outcomes for people with aphasia, compared to the usual speech pathology treatments. This trial will be running in various locations in Victoria, Western Australia, New South Wales, Queensland and Tasmania.

Associate Professor Miranda Rose, La Trobe University,  compareaphasia@latrobe.edu.au 
Website: www.latrobe.edu.au/compare

Free support program for stroke survivors and carers

Have you had a stroke or are you caring for someone who has?

This 8 week program aims to help you:

  •     Develop strategies for managing symptoms and connecting with services.
  •     Identify your strengths and abilities
  •     Make goals and respond to change
  •     Create actionable plans that help you feel safe and happy

The support program is conducted one-on-one with a professional healthcare professional. It can be completed face-to-face (Melbourne) or over the phone (national).

This program is a part of a collaborative evidence-based research program run by St Vincent’s Hospital, the Australian Catholic University and the University of Melbourne.   

Contact Zoe Jenkins during office hours on 03 9231 3779 or ohp@svha.org.au

Older carers and mental wellbeing

The research project investigates the link between older carers’ physical activity and mental wellbeing. The research outcomes will improve the understanding of older carers' health needs and future designs of activity programs for older carers. Participants will be asked to complete a 15-minute survey online or on paper about their physical health, mood states and levels of physical activity. More information can be found in the Information Letter or by contacting Chenhong Xu on chenhong.xu@myacu.edu.au

Click here for more.

 

Pain in Stroke Study: RECOGNISE

The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health are conducting an online research project investigating pain in stroke. The project involves answering a questionnaire and performing 4 interactive tasks regarding body ownership and recognition. The success of this project relies on recruiting large numbers of participants with and without stroke. We invite everyone over 18 to participate. Participation is easy and should take between 15 and 25 minutes, and is done entirely online. You do not need to give any personal information to participate.

Click here for more. 

This will take you straight to the information sheet, where you can read more about the project, and agree to participate if you wish.

If you would like any further details, please feel free to contact Brendon Haslam directly brendon.h@cliftonhillphysiotherapy.com.au 

 

Join the Communication Research Registry

The Communication Research Registry is a national register of people who would like to be involved in communication research. This includes research that looks into speech and language difficulties post stroke. People with communication difficulties, their family and friends and members of the public are invited to join. Click here.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.