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Research projects seeking consumers

When you get involved in research, you contribute to improving knowledge about stroke, stroke treatment and recovery. Getting involved in research may allow you to get access to emerging therapy you wouldn’t otherwise have opportunity to use. Involvement may also be part of your stroke recovery plan.

If you are a researcher and would like to use this site to promote a project, please visit our request for research participant policy page for more information.

There are currently no research projects listed for the Australian Capital Territory. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

There are currently no research projects listed for the Australian Capital Territory. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Towards a better model of upper limb recovery after a stroke

This study aims to understand how motor pathways that originate in your brain and control muscles in your arms may change over time after a stroke. Participants will complete questionnaires about daily living activities, perform clinical assessments of arm function, and undergo non-invasive brain stimulation (termed transcranial magnetic stimulation) at the Clinical Neurostimulation Laboratory at UTS Moore Park Campus.

Find out more about the study

Muscle and tendon properties in stroke

Researchers at Neuroscience Research Australia are seeking volunteers to participate in a study that investigates causes of muscle contracture (stiffening of muscles) after stroke. People are eligible to participate in the study if they have had a stroke and have an ankle that has become stiffer since the stroke. Participants will have an ultrasound scan and an MRI scan at NeuRA (at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Randwick, NSW).

Find out more about the study

CLEAR Outcomes study: For people with, or at high risk for, cardiovascular disease who are statin intolerant

This study is testing if an investigational medication reduces the risk of major cardiovascular events in participants with, or at high risk for, cardiovascular disease. The study will also look at how the medication may affect cholesterol levels and how safe it is. The study lasts for 2-5 years, involving both visits to our centre and phone calls. Visits will be frequent in the initial phases, moving on to 3 monthly as the study progresses. Participants need to be over 18, have, or be at high risk for, cardiovascular disease, and be unable to tolerate statins.

Find out more about the study

A comparative open label study comparing the efficacy of structured physiotherapy vs non structured physiotherapy in reducing post-stroke spasticity related shoulder pain in patients treated with Botulinum toxin A

This research study will examine whether it is possible to reduce the stiffness or tightness of the shoulder muscles by:

  • Giving botulinum toxin injections into the shoulder muscles, or
  • Combining botulinum toxin injections with structured exercises (physiotherapy).

Participants will need to attend the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney NSW.

For more information, contact the Outpatient Rehabilitation Department at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital on 02 9515 9889 and speak to Lucienne Kennewell, lucienne.kennewell@health.nsw.gov.au

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Towards a better model of upper limb recovery after a stroke

This study aims to understand how motor pathways that originate in your brain and control muscles in your arms may change over time after a stroke. Participants will complete questionnaires about daily living activities, perform clinical assessments of arm function, and undergo non-invasive brain stimulation (termed transcranial magnetic stimulation) at the Clinical Neurostimulation Laboratory at UTS Moore Park Campus.

Find out more about the study

Muscle and tendon properties in stroke

Researchers at Neuroscience Research Australia are seeking volunteers to participate in a study that investigates causes of muscle contracture (stiffening of muscles) after stroke. People are eligible to participate in the study if they have had a stroke and have an ankle that has become stiffer since the stroke. Participants will have an ultrasound scan and an MRI scan at NeuRA (at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Randwick, NSW).

Find out more about the study

CLEAR Outcomes study: For people with, or at high risk for, cardiovascular disease who are statin intolerant

This study is testing if an investigational medication reduces the risk of major cardiovascular events in participants with, or at high risk for, cardiovascular disease. The study will also look at how the medication may affect cholesterol levels and how safe it is. The study lasts for 2-5 years, involving both visits to our centre and phone calls. Visits will be frequent in the initial phases, moving on to 3 monthly as the study progresses. Participants need to be over 18, have, or be at high risk for, cardiovascular disease, and be unable to tolerate statins.

Find out more about the study

A comparative open label study comparing the efficacy of structured physiotherapy vs non structured physiotherapy in reducing post-stroke spasticity related shoulder pain in patients treated with Botulinum toxin A

This research study will examine whether it is possible to reduce the stiffness or tightness of the shoulder muscles by:

  • Giving botulinum toxin injections into the shoulder muscles, or
  • Combining botulinum toxin injections with structured exercises (physiotherapy).

Participants will need to attend the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney NSW.

For more information, contact the Outpatient Rehabilitation Department at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital on 02 9515 9889 and speak to Lucienne Kennewell, lucienne.kennewell@health.nsw.gov.au

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

There are currently no research projects listed for the Northern Territory. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

There are currently no research projects listed for the Northern Territory. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

The experience of cyclone shelters from the perspective of people with disabilities during tropical cyclones in northern Queensland

Cyclone shelters are generally not purposefully planned or built to accommodate the needs of people with disabilities. Researchers from James Cook University are aiming to explore the experiences of people with disabilities in shelters during tropical cyclones in northern Queensland. People with a disability who would be happy to share their experience of a cyclone shelter (accessed between 2011–2017) are invited to participate in an interview that will take approximately 1 hour to complete.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

The experience of cyclone shelters from the perspective of people with disabilities during tropical cyclones in northern Queensland

Cyclone shelters are generally not purposefully planned or built to accommodate the needs of people with disabilities. Researchers from James Cook University are aiming to explore the experiences of people with disabilities in shelters during tropical cyclones in northern Queensland. People with a disability who would be happy to share their experience of a cyclone shelter (accessed between 2011–2017) are invited to participate in an interview that will take approximately 1 hour to complete.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Using brain stimulation to treat post-stroke depression

This study aims to investigate non-invasive brain stimulation approaches to treat people who are experiencing post-stroke depression. Following initial assessment involving series of questionnaires, eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either real or sham brain stimulation. All recruited participants will attend 10 treatment sessions which will involve brain stimulation and some measure to test the effectiveness of this treatment.

Find out more about the study

Identifying and addressing information needs of carers of stroke survivors

Friends and family members who provide support to stroke survivors (carers) are being invited to participate in an interview to discuss what information is important to know when a friend or family member has a stroke. If you choose to participate, you will be asked to talk about what message you would like to share with other carers. This interview might be face-to-face or over the phone.

Find out more about the study

Targeting brain stimulation therapy in stroke

This study aims to determine whether the reliability of brain stimulation can be improved as a treatment for arm and hand function following stroke. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either real or sham brain stimluation plus an exercise program delivered for two weeks at home.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Using brain stimulation to treat post-stroke depression

This study aims to investigate non-invasive brain stimulation approaches to treat people who are experiencing post-stroke depression. Following initial assessment involving series of questionnaires, eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either real or sham brain stimulation. All recruited participants will attend 10 treatment sessions which will involve brain stimulation and some measure to test the effectiveness of this treatment.

Find out more about the study

Identifying and addressing information needs of carers of stroke survivors

Friends and family members who provide support to stroke survivors (carers) are being invited to participate in an interview to discuss what information is important to know when a friend or family member has a stroke. If you choose to participate, you will be asked to talk about what message you would like to share with other carers. This interview might be face-to-face or over the phone.

Find out more about the study

Targeting brain stimulation therapy in stroke

This study aims to determine whether the reliability of brain stimulation can be improved as a treatment for arm and hand function following stroke. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either real or sham brain stimluation plus an exercise program delivered for two weeks at home.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

There are currently no research projects listed for Tasmania. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

There are currently no research projects listed for Tasmania. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Valued Living After Neurological Trauma (VaLiANT): Evaluation of a new group-based intervention to enhance valued living for people with cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury

Have you had an acquired brain injury that has affected how you think and feel? Are you interested in learning ways to deal with these changes so you can do more of the things you value in life? Difficulties with memory and other thinking skills, along with changes in mood, can affect the capacity to do things that are meaningful and valued, such as work, leisure and social activities. VaLiANT is a new 8-week group program located at La Trobe University in Bundoora (VIC) for adults (aged 18 years of over) who have had a stroke (at least 3 months ago), designed to increase your participation in activities that you value while helping you learn strategies for dealing with changes in thinking and mood.

Find out more about the study

Re-imagining Stroke Environments with Virtual Reality (RiSE-VR)

Researchers from The Florey Institute and Swinburne University are exploring the responses of stroke survivors to a novel patient room design immersive virtual reality experience (VR). There is limited scientific knowledge informing the design of hospital environments for people who have had a stroke. Participation involves completing 2 VR sessions lasting 60 minutes each, and answering some questionnaires. You are eligible for this study if you have had a stroke and are discharged from hospital at least 1 month.

Find out more about the study

A comparison of teaching techniques to train the use of smartphone memory apps in stroke survivors

Smartphones can be very helpful tools for everyday activities that require memory. After a stroke, many people find it difficult to learn or remember how to use smartphones, which becomes a barrier for using them as a memory aid. Researchers from Monash University are comparing three training techniques to teach people how to use an app in their smartphone. Participation includes 4 sessions, which can be completed at the Monash Psychology Centre in Notting Hill, at the La Trobe Psychology Clinic in Bundoora, or at your home. If you live in Melbourne, have had a stroke, are currently experiencing memory difficulties, have a smartphone and would like to feel more confident using it, you are invited to participate in this study.

Find out more about the study

Assessing the efficacy and efficiency of simulated driver rehabilitation following acquired brain injury

This project is investigating whether using a driving simulator is useful and cost-effective in helping those have had a stroke return to driving. Participants are eligible if they have had a stroke and have previously held a full or probationary licence and require a driving assessment to return to driving. This study will involve being allocated to either a simulator rehabilitation group or a standard rehabilitation group. This study is being conducted across Epworth Rehabilitation hospitals at Richmond, Hawthorn and Camberwell.

Find out more about the study

Brain machine interfaces

This study investigates how the brain controls movements and how loss of limb function due to paralysis or amputation may affect the brain’s activity when thinking about movement. This research could provide important information for developing better treatment options for limb function loss. Your brain activity will be measured using non-invasive machines that record electrical and magnetic activity produced by your brain.

Find out more about the study

Associated reaction measurement study

People with stroke or other acquired brain injury may experience associated reactions, which are unwanted movements in their arms while walking or exerting effort, leading to awkward arm postures. This study is seeking participants to help develop an assessment of associated reactions while walking, and to determine the main impairments that contribute to it.

Find out more about the study

The use of telehealth methods in neuropsychology following stroke

Researchers from Monash University are interested in researching new ways to help identify stroke survivors who are experiencing cognitive difficulties so that they can access appropriate rehabilitation.

This research involves two three-hour sessions at Monash University Clayton. One conducted in-person and one conducted over videoconference. In each session, participants will complete a series of tasks to assess different aspects of their thinking (e.g., memory). Participants will be provided with a one-page summary or their results. Note that you do not need to be experiencing cognitive difficulties to participate in this study.

To register or get more information contact Jodie Chapman via email (jodie.chapman@monash.edu) or phone (0401 148 123)

Explanatory statement for the project (PDF, 101 KB)

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Valued Living After Neurological Trauma (VaLiANT): Evaluation of a new group-based intervention to enhance valued living for people with cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury

Have you had an acquired brain injury that has affected how you think and feel? Are you interested in learning ways to deal with these changes so you can do more of the things you value in life? Difficulties with memory and other thinking skills, along with changes in mood, can affect the capacity to do things that are meaningful and valued, such as work, leisure and social activities. VaLiANT is a new 8-week group program located at La Trobe University in Bundoora (VIC) for adults (aged 18 years of over) who have had a stroke (at least 3 months ago), designed to increase your participation in activities that you value while helping you learn strategies for dealing with changes in thinking and mood.

Find out more about the study

Re-imagining Stroke Environments with Virtual Reality (RiSE-VR)

Researchers from The Florey Institute and Swinburne University are exploring the responses of stroke survivors to a novel patient room design immersive virtual reality experience (VR). There is limited scientific knowledge informing the design of hospital environments for people who have had a stroke. Participation involves completing 2 VR sessions lasting 60 minutes each, and answering some questionnaires. You are eligible for this study if you have had a stroke and are discharged from hospital at least 1 month.

Find out more about the study

A comparison of teaching techniques to train the use of smartphone memory apps in stroke survivors

Smartphones can be very helpful tools for everyday activities that require memory. After a stroke, many people find it difficult to learn or remember how to use smartphones, which becomes a barrier for using them as a memory aid. Researchers from Monash University are comparing three training techniques to teach people how to use an app in their smartphone. Participation includes 4 sessions, which can be completed at the Monash Psychology Centre in Notting Hill, at the La Trobe Psychology Clinic in Bundoora, or at your home. If you live in Melbourne, have had a stroke, are currently experiencing memory difficulties, have a smartphone and would like to feel more confident using it, you are invited to participate in this study.

Find out more about the study

Assessing the efficacy and efficiency of simulated driver rehabilitation following acquired brain injury

This project is investigating whether using a driving simulator is useful and cost-effective in helping those have had a stroke return to driving. Participants are eligible if they have had a stroke and have previously held a full or probationary licence and require a driving assessment to return to driving. This study will involve being allocated to either a simulator rehabilitation group or a standard rehabilitation group. This study is being conducted across Epworth Rehabilitation hospitals at Richmond, Hawthorn and Camberwell.

Find out more about the study

Brain machine interfaces

This study investigates how the brain controls movements and how loss of limb function due to paralysis or amputation may affect the brain’s activity when thinking about movement. This research could provide important information for developing better treatment options for limb function loss. Your brain activity will be measured using non-invasive machines that record electrical and magnetic activity produced by your brain.

Find out more about the study

Associated reaction measurement study

People with stroke or other acquired brain injury may experience associated reactions, which are unwanted movements in their arms while walking or exerting effort, leading to awkward arm postures. This study is seeking participants to help develop an assessment of associated reactions while walking, and to determine the main impairments that contribute to it.

Find out more about the study

The use of telehealth methods in neuropsychology following stroke

Researchers from Monash University are interested in researching new ways to help identify stroke survivors who are experiencing cognitive difficulties so that they can access appropriate rehabilitation.

This research involves two three-hour sessions at Monash University Clayton. One conducted in-person and one conducted over videoconference. In each session, participants will complete a series of tasks to assess different aspects of their thinking (e.g., memory). Participants will be provided with a one-page summary or their results. Note that you do not need to be experiencing cognitive difficulties to participate in this study.

To register or get more information contact Jodie Chapman via email (jodie.chapman@monash.edu) or phone (0401 148 123)

Explanatory statement for the project (PDF, 101 KB)

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Contralateral effects of eccentric resistance training on muscle function of impaired arm of stroke patients

This study aims to improve recovery of your affected arm by training with your unaffected arm after stroke. If you participate in this study you will receive training twice a week for 8 weeks to strengthen your arm's movements.

Find out more about the study

Strengthening connections in the motor cortex to improve motor function following stroke

Murdoch University is investigating connections between motor areas of the brain and how the strength of these connections is related to balance and walking abilities. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires to assess suitability to receive non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial magnetic stimulation), a cognitive assessment, a movement assessment, and several motor tasks (e.g. walking 10 m, stepping on-and-off a small step).

Find out more about the study

The relationship between thinking skills and daily functioning in adults with brain injuries

The University of Western Australia is researching how thinking skills following a brain injury like stroke affect how well people can do things such as work or hobbies. Participants will need to attend the University of Western Australia in Perth to have an assessment and complete questionnaires and tests, and attend a follow-up in three months’ time. Case managers or partners will also be invited to participate. A report about how participants went can be provided on request.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Contralateral effects of eccentric resistance training on muscle function of impaired arm of stroke patients

This study aims to improve recovery of your affected arm by training with your unaffected arm after stroke. If you participate in this study you will receive training twice a week for 8 weeks to strengthen your arm's movements.

Find out more about the study

Strengthening connections in the motor cortex to improve motor function following stroke

Murdoch University is investigating connections between motor areas of the brain and how the strength of these connections is related to balance and walking abilities. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires to assess suitability to receive non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial magnetic stimulation), a cognitive assessment, a movement assessment, and several motor tasks (e.g. walking 10 m, stepping on-and-off a small step).

Find out more about the study

The relationship between thinking skills and daily functioning in adults with brain injuries

The University of Western Australia is researching how thinking skills following a brain injury like stroke affect how well people can do things such as work or hobbies. Participants will need to attend the University of Western Australia in Perth to have an assessment and complete questionnaires and tests, and attend a follow-up in three months’ time. Case managers or partners will also be invited to participate. A report about how participants went can be provided on request.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Healthcare communication survey

Australian residents over 18 years of age are invited to complete an anonymous online survey on communication in healthcare settings. The purpose of this research is to understand how people feel about communicating with healthcare practitioners when they attend as patients in primary healthcare settings, such as medical and dental services.

Find out more about the study

Identifying and addressing information needs of carers of stroke survivors

Friends and family members who provide support to stroke survivors (carers) are being invited to participate in an interview to discuss what information is important to know when a friend or family member has a stroke. If you choose to participate, you will be asked to talk about what message you would like to share with other carers. This interview might be face-to-face or over the phone.

Find out more about the study

A sociological study of patients' use of digital media

Researchers from the School of Social Sciences at Monash University in Melbourne are looking for participants for a study that aims to reveal how activists, advocates and representatives from different patient communities are using digital media, such as Facebook, Twitter and crowdfunding platforms, to shape decisions around the development and availability of new medical treatments.

Find out more about the study

Treatment for sleep disturbance and fatigue following acquired brain injury

Over half of the stroke population experiences problems with sleep or fatigue. Researchers at the Monash Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre are trialling two forms of therapy to treat sleep and fatigue problems following stroke: cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and health education (INFO) therapy. Participants engage in 8 sessions of therapy with a clinical neuropsychologist. These sessions can be completed in-person for local participants, or via a video conferencing program for interstate or rural participants.

Find out more about the study

COMPARE – Constraint induced or multi-modal aphasia rehabilitation: an RCT of therapy for stroke related chronic aphasia

Following a stroke, some people find they have difficulty saying words and sentences. This language problem is called aphasia. This study aims to compare different treatments for people with problems talking after a stroke. We want to see if one treatment is better than the other, and to compare these treatments to usual speech pathology treatment.

Find out more about the study

Development of a sexuality intervention for stroke survivors and their partners

4 out of 5 Australian stroke survivors do not have the opportunity to discuss sexuality or receive information about sexuality. Sexuality is more than just about 'having sex', it also includes roles and identities, relationships and intimacy. Researchers from The University of Sydney would like to develop an educational package that can be provided to stroke survivors and partners of stroke survivors. The study aims to find out what topics should be included in this package and how it should be delivered. If you choose to participate you will be asked to complete two surveys about what you think is important for sexuality after stroke. Your responses are confidential and you will not be asked to share any information about your own experiences of sexuality.

Find out more about the study

Psychological recovery after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: the moderating effects of post-traumatic growth

Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) is a life-threatening type of haemorrhagic stroke, and people who have had an aSAH are at high risk of negative psychological outcomes. This study aims to find out if people who have had an aSAH can also experience post-traumatic growth, and whether this can help protect them from negative psychological outcomes. The study will involve a confidential online survey, with the option of a second in-depth interview conducted face-to-face or via telephone.

Find out more about the study

Survey of preference for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke

Investigators:
Dr. Feng Wang, A/Prof. Bruce C.V. Campbell, Prof. Stephen M. Davis,A/Prof. Bernard Yan

The Melbourne Brain Centre at the Royal Melbourne Hospital would like to invite stroke survivors, carers, family members and friends to participate in a survey focused on the preference for selection criteria of acute stroke treatment (also termed clot retrieval which is a way to remove clots in blocked brain arteries). Recent trials of clot retrieval for acute ischemic stroke demonstrated superior benefit of clot retrieval compared with intravenous thrombolysis alone when there is a major vessel occlusion. However, it remains unknown, which selection criteria should be used to select those patients. In this survey, we sought to evaluate the preferences for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke.  The results of the survey may inform decision-making and selection for clot retrieval.

The following instructions can guide you to complete the questionnaire step by step:

1. Please go to the questionnaire URL:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QK8LHQ8

2. Read the web-version questionnaire.

3. Complete the questions.

4. Press “Submit” bottom.

Join the Communication Research Registry

The Communication Research Registry is a national register of people who would like to be involved in communication research. This includes research that looks into speech and language difficulties post stroke. People with communication difficulties, their family and friends and members of the public are invited to join. Click here.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Healthcare communication survey

Australian residents over 18 years of age are invited to complete an anonymous online survey on communication in healthcare settings. The purpose of this research is to understand how people feel about communicating with healthcare practitioners when they attend as patients in primary healthcare settings, such as medical and dental services.

Find out more about the study

Identifying and addressing information needs of carers of stroke survivors

Friends and family members who provide support to stroke survivors (carers) are being invited to participate in an interview to discuss what information is important to know when a friend or family member has a stroke. If you choose to participate, you will be asked to talk about what message you would like to share with other carers. This interview might be face-to-face or over the phone.

Find out more about the study

A sociological study of patients' use of digital media

Researchers from the School of Social Sciences at Monash University in Melbourne are looking for participants for a study that aims to reveal how activists, advocates and representatives from different patient communities are using digital media, such as Facebook, Twitter and crowdfunding platforms, to shape decisions around the development and availability of new medical treatments.

Find out more about the study

Treatment for sleep disturbance and fatigue following acquired brain injury

Over half of the stroke population experiences problems with sleep or fatigue. Researchers at the Monash Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre are trialling two forms of therapy to treat sleep and fatigue problems following stroke: cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and health education (INFO) therapy. Participants engage in 8 sessions of therapy with a clinical neuropsychologist. These sessions can be completed in-person for local participants, or via a video conferencing program for interstate or rural participants.

Find out more about the study

COMPARE – Constraint induced or multi-modal aphasia rehabilitation: an RCT of therapy for stroke related chronic aphasia

Following a stroke, some people find they have difficulty saying words and sentences. This language problem is called aphasia. This study aims to compare different treatments for people with problems talking after a stroke. We want to see if one treatment is better than the other, and to compare these treatments to usual speech pathology treatment.

Find out more about the study

Development of a sexuality intervention for stroke survivors and their partners

4 out of 5 Australian stroke survivors do not have the opportunity to discuss sexuality or receive information about sexuality. Sexuality is more than just about 'having sex', it also includes roles and identities, relationships and intimacy. Researchers from The University of Sydney would like to develop an educational package that can be provided to stroke survivors and partners of stroke survivors. The study aims to find out what topics should be included in this package and how it should be delivered. If you choose to participate you will be asked to complete two surveys about what you think is important for sexuality after stroke. Your responses are confidential and you will not be asked to share any information about your own experiences of sexuality.

Find out more about the study

Psychological recovery after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: the moderating effects of post-traumatic growth

Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) is a life-threatening type of haemorrhagic stroke, and people who have had an aSAH are at high risk of negative psychological outcomes. This study aims to find out if people who have had an aSAH can also experience post-traumatic growth, and whether this can help protect them from negative psychological outcomes. The study will involve a confidential online survey, with the option of a second in-depth interview conducted face-to-face or via telephone.

Find out more about the study

Survey of preference for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke

Investigators:
Dr. Feng Wang, A/Prof. Bruce C.V. Campbell, Prof. Stephen M. Davis,A/Prof. Bernard Yan

The Melbourne Brain Centre at the Royal Melbourne Hospital would like to invite stroke survivors, carers, family members and friends to participate in a survey focused on the preference for selection criteria of acute stroke treatment (also termed clot retrieval which is a way to remove clots in blocked brain arteries). Recent trials of clot retrieval for acute ischemic stroke demonstrated superior benefit of clot retrieval compared with intravenous thrombolysis alone when there is a major vessel occlusion. However, it remains unknown, which selection criteria should be used to select those patients. In this survey, we sought to evaluate the preferences for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke.  The results of the survey may inform decision-making and selection for clot retrieval.

The following instructions can guide you to complete the questionnaire step by step:

1. Please go to the questionnaire URL:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QK8LHQ8

2. Read the web-version questionnaire.

3. Complete the questions.

4. Press “Submit” bottom.

Join the Communication Research Registry

The Communication Research Registry is a national register of people who would like to be involved in communication research. This includes research that looks into speech and language difficulties post stroke. People with communication difficulties, their family and friends and members of the public are invited to join. Click here.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.