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Research projects seeking consumers

When you get involved in research, you contribute to improving knowledge about stroke, stroke treatment and recovery. Getting involved in research may allow you to get access to emerging therapy you wouldn’t otherwise have opportunity to use. Involvement may also be part of your stroke recovery plan.

If you are a researcher and would like to use this site to promote a project, please visit our request for research participant policy page for more information.

There are currently no research projects listed for the Australian Capital Territory. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

There are currently no research projects listed for the Australian Capital Territory. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Towards a better model of upper limb recovery after a stroke

This study aims to understand how motor pathways that originate in your brain and control muscles in your arms may change over time after a stroke. Participants will complete questionnaires about daily living activities, perform clinical assessments of arm function, and undergo non-invasive brain stimulation (termed transcranial magnetic stimulation) at the Clinical Neurostimulation Laboratory at UTS Moore Park Campus.

Find out more about the study

Muscle and tendon properties in stroke

Researchers at Neuroscience Research Australia are seeking volunteers to participate in a study that investigates causes of muscle contracture (stiffening of muscles) after stroke. People are eligible to participate in the study if they have had a stroke and have an ankle that has become stiffer since the stroke. Participants will have an ultrasound scan and an MRI scan at NeuRA (at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Randwick, NSW).

Find out more about the study

CLEAR Outcomes study: For people with, or at high risk for, cardiovascular disease who are statin intolerant

This study is testing if an investigational medication reduces the risk of major cardiovascular events in participants with, or at high risk for, cardiovascular disease. The study will also look at how the medication may affect cholesterol levels and how safe it is. The study lasts for 2-5 years, involving both visits to our centre and phone calls. Visits will be frequent in the initial phases, moving on to 3 monthly as the study progresses. Participants need to be over 18, have, or be at high risk for, cardiovascular disease, and be unable to tolerate statins.

Find out more about the study

InTENSE Trial - Optimising upper limb recovery after stroke

This study aims to determine whether intensive, evidence-based upper limb movement training after anti-spasticity intervention (botulinum toxin-A injection) increases the amount of movement patients achieve in their arm and hand following stroke. After being assessed to determine they will benefit from an injection, patients are either given 12 weeks of regular intensive therapy at both in the hospital and at home, or a 12-week program to complete at home daily.

Find out more about the study

A comparative open label study comparing the efficacy of structured physiotherapy vs non structured physiotherapy in reducing post-stroke spasticity related shoulder pain in patients treated with Botulinum toxin A

This research study will examine whether it is possible to reduce the stiffness or tightness of the shoulder muscles by:

  • Giving botulinum toxin injections into the shoulder muscles, or
  • Combining botulinum toxin injections with structured exercises (physiotherapy).

Participants will need to attend the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney NSW.

For more information, contact the Outpatient Rehabilitation Department at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital on 02 9515 9889 and speak to Lucienne Kennewell, lucienne.kennewell@health.nsw.gov.au

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Towards a better model of upper limb recovery after a stroke

This study aims to understand how motor pathways that originate in your brain and control muscles in your arms may change over time after a stroke. Participants will complete questionnaires about daily living activities, perform clinical assessments of arm function, and undergo non-invasive brain stimulation (termed transcranial magnetic stimulation) at the Clinical Neurostimulation Laboratory at UTS Moore Park Campus.

Find out more about the study

Muscle and tendon properties in stroke

Researchers at Neuroscience Research Australia are seeking volunteers to participate in a study that investigates causes of muscle contracture (stiffening of muscles) after stroke. People are eligible to participate in the study if they have had a stroke and have an ankle that has become stiffer since the stroke. Participants will have an ultrasound scan and an MRI scan at NeuRA (at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Randwick, NSW).

Find out more about the study

CLEAR Outcomes study: For people with, or at high risk for, cardiovascular disease who are statin intolerant

This study is testing if an investigational medication reduces the risk of major cardiovascular events in participants with, or at high risk for, cardiovascular disease. The study will also look at how the medication may affect cholesterol levels and how safe it is. The study lasts for 2-5 years, involving both visits to our centre and phone calls. Visits will be frequent in the initial phases, moving on to 3 monthly as the study progresses. Participants need to be over 18, have, or be at high risk for, cardiovascular disease, and be unable to tolerate statins.

Find out more about the study

InTENSE Trial - Optimising upper limb recovery after stroke

This study aims to determine whether intensive, evidence-based upper limb movement training after anti-spasticity intervention (botulinum toxin-A injection) increases the amount of movement patients achieve in their arm and hand following stroke. After being assessed to determine they will benefit from an injection, patients are either given 12 weeks of regular intensive therapy at both in the hospital and at home, or a 12-week program to complete at home daily.

Find out more about the study

A comparative open label study comparing the efficacy of structured physiotherapy vs non structured physiotherapy in reducing post-stroke spasticity related shoulder pain in patients treated with Botulinum toxin A

This research study will examine whether it is possible to reduce the stiffness or tightness of the shoulder muscles by:

  • Giving botulinum toxin injections into the shoulder muscles, or
  • Combining botulinum toxin injections with structured exercises (physiotherapy).

Participants will need to attend the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney NSW.

For more information, contact the Outpatient Rehabilitation Department at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital on 02 9515 9889 and speak to Lucienne Kennewell, lucienne.kennewell@health.nsw.gov.au

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Assessing the efficacy and efficiency of simulated driver rehabilitation following acquired brain injury

This project is investigating whether using a driving simulator is useful and cost-effective in helping those have had a stroke return to driving. Participants are eligible if they have had a stroke and have previously held a full or probationary licence and require a driving assessment to return to driving. This study will involve being allocated to either a simulator rehabilitation group or a standard rehabilitation group. This study is being conducted across Epworth Rehabilitation hospitals at Richmond, Hawthorn and Camberwell.

Find out more about the study

Brain machine interfaces

This study investigates how the brain controls movements and how loss of limb function due to paralysis or amputation may affect the brain’s activity when thinking about movement. This research could provide important information for developing better treatment options for limb function loss. Your brain activity will be measured using non-invasive machines that record electrical and magnetic activity produced by your brain.

Find out more about the study

InTENSE Trial - Optimising upper limb recovery after stroke

This study aims to determine whether intensive, evidence-based upper limb movement training after anti-spasticity intervention (botulinum toxin-A injection) increases the amount of movement patients achieve in their arm and hand following stroke. After being assessed to determine they will benefit from an injection, patients are either given 12 weeks of regular intensive therapy at both in the hospital and at home, or a 12-week program to complete at home daily.

Find out more about the study

Associated reaction measurement study

People with stroke or other acquired brain injury may experience associated reactions, which are unwanted movements in their arms while walking or exerting effort, leading to awkward arm postures. This study is seeking participants to help develop an assessment of associated reactions while walking, and to determine the main impairments that contribute to it.

Find out more about the study

The use of telehealth methods in neuropsychology following stroke

Researchers from Monash University are interested in researching new ways to help identify stroke survivors who are experiencing cognitive difficulties so that they can access appropriate rehabilitation.

This research involves two three-hour sessions at Monash University Clayton. One conducted in-person and one conducted over videoconference. In each session, participants will complete a series of tasks to assess different aspects of their thinking (e.g., memory). Participants will be provided with a one-page summary or their results. Note that you do not need to be experiencing cognitive difficulties to participate in this study.

To register or get more information contact Jodie Chapman via email (jodie.chapman@monash.edu) or phone (0401 148 123)

Explanatory statement for the project (PDF, 101 KB)

The Use of Smartphones following Stroke

Monash University’s School of Psychological Sciences is seeking adult stroke survivors who have no history of any other neurological condition to participate in this study exploring the experiences of and attitudes towards the use of smartphones in stroke survivors.

The study involves a survey about your experiences with and attitudes toward smartphones, as well as several brief questionnaires assessing your emotional state, your level of functioning in daily life and two brief cognitive assessments including a memory task. These can be completed over the phone, at your home, or at Monash University in Clayton. Participation is expected to take about ninety minutes.

Participants will go into the draw to win an iPod shuffle. Please see the attached participant information sheet for more information: Monash Uni study explanatory statement

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Assessing the efficacy and efficiency of simulated driver rehabilitation following acquired brain injury

This project is investigating whether using a driving simulator is useful and cost-effective in helping those have had a stroke return to driving. Participants are eligible if they have had a stroke and have previously held a full or probationary licence and require a driving assessment to return to driving. This study will involve being allocated to either a simulator rehabilitation group or a standard rehabilitation group. This study is being conducted across Epworth Rehabilitation hospitals at Richmond, Hawthorn and Camberwell.

Find out more about the study

Brain machine interfaces

This study investigates how the brain controls movements and how loss of limb function due to paralysis or amputation may affect the brain’s activity when thinking about movement. This research could provide important information for developing better treatment options for limb function loss. Your brain activity will be measured using non-invasive machines that record electrical and magnetic activity produced by your brain.

Find out more about the study

InTENSE Trial - Optimising upper limb recovery after stroke

This study aims to determine whether intensive, evidence-based upper limb movement training after anti-spasticity intervention (botulinum toxin-A injection) increases the amount of movement patients achieve in their arm and hand following stroke. After being assessed to determine they will benefit from an injection, patients are either given 12 weeks of regular intensive therapy at both in the hospital and at home, or a 12-week program to complete at home daily.

Find out more about the study

Associated reaction measurement study

People with stroke or other acquired brain injury may experience associated reactions, which are unwanted movements in their arms while walking or exerting effort, leading to awkward arm postures. This study is seeking participants to help develop an assessment of associated reactions while walking, and to determine the main impairments that contribute to it.

Find out more about the study

The use of telehealth methods in neuropsychology following stroke

Researchers from Monash University are interested in researching new ways to help identify stroke survivors who are experiencing cognitive difficulties so that they can access appropriate rehabilitation.

This research involves two three-hour sessions at Monash University Clayton. One conducted in-person and one conducted over videoconference. In each session, participants will complete a series of tasks to assess different aspects of their thinking (e.g., memory). Participants will be provided with a one-page summary or their results. Note that you do not need to be experiencing cognitive difficulties to participate in this study.

To register or get more information contact Jodie Chapman via email (jodie.chapman@monash.edu) or phone (0401 148 123)

Explanatory statement for the project (PDF, 101 KB)

The Use of Smartphones following Stroke

Monash University’s School of Psychological Sciences is seeking adult stroke survivors who have no history of any other neurological condition to participate in this study exploring the experiences of and attitudes towards the use of smartphones in stroke survivors.

The study involves a survey about your experiences with and attitudes toward smartphones, as well as several brief questionnaires assessing your emotional state, your level of functioning in daily life and two brief cognitive assessments including a memory task. These can be completed over the phone, at your home, or at Monash University in Clayton. Participation is expected to take about ninety minutes.

Participants will go into the draw to win an iPod shuffle. Please see the attached participant information sheet for more information: Monash Uni study explanatory statement

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Evaluating the feasibility of providing a newly developed multifactorial falls prevention programme for community-dwelling patients after stroke

A small research study is seeking 10 community-dwelling people from the Perth area who are aged 50 and over, who have had a stroke at least 6 months ago, who are able to walk at least three times weekly outside their home without hands on supervision (the use of a walking aid is allowed) and who do not have severe cognitive impairments or aphasia. We want to find out if attending a newly developed falls prevention programme helps to influence the participants’ fear of falling, quality of life, strength, balance, mobility and social engagement. Participants will be asked to attend 12 two-hour classes over a period of eight weeks.

Find out more about the study

Strengthening connections in the motor cortex to improve motor function following stroke

Murdoch University is investigating connections between motor areas of the brain and how the strength of these connections is related to balance and walking abilities. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires to assess suitability to receive non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial magnetic stimulation), a cognitive assessment, a movement assessment, and several motor tasks (e.g. walking 10 m, stepping on-and-off a small step).

Find out more about the study

The relationship between thinking skills and daily functioning in adults with brain injuries

The University of Western Australia is researching how thinking skills following a brain injury like stroke affect how well people can do things such as work or hobbies. Participants will need to attend the University of Western Australia in Perth to have an assessment and complete questionnaires and tests, and attend a follow-up in three months’ time. Case managers or partners will also be invited to participate. A report about how participants went can be provided on request.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Evaluating the feasibility of providing a newly developed multifactorial falls prevention programme for community-dwelling patients after stroke

A small research study is seeking 10 community-dwelling people from the Perth area who are aged 50 and over, who have had a stroke at least 6 months ago, who are able to walk at least three times weekly outside their home without hands on supervision (the use of a walking aid is allowed) and who do not have severe cognitive impairments or aphasia. We want to find out if attending a newly developed falls prevention programme helps to influence the participants’ fear of falling, quality of life, strength, balance, mobility and social engagement. Participants will be asked to attend 12 two-hour classes over a period of eight weeks.

Find out more about the study

Strengthening connections in the motor cortex to improve motor function following stroke

Murdoch University is investigating connections between motor areas of the brain and how the strength of these connections is related to balance and walking abilities. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires to assess suitability to receive non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial magnetic stimulation), a cognitive assessment, a movement assessment, and several motor tasks (e.g. walking 10 m, stepping on-and-off a small step).

Find out more about the study

The relationship between thinking skills and daily functioning in adults with brain injuries

The University of Western Australia is researching how thinking skills following a brain injury like stroke affect how well people can do things such as work or hobbies. Participants will need to attend the University of Western Australia in Perth to have an assessment and complete questionnaires and tests, and attend a follow-up in three months’ time. Case managers or partners will also be invited to participate. A report about how participants went can be provided on request.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Better Individualised Stroke Care Using Technology (BISCUT)

The aim of this study is to co-design and build a stroke portal that will enable patients across Metro North Hospital and Health Services (MNHHS) to access a range of personal health information on their smart phone or tablet. The research team is seeking consumer engagement at the very early design phase to ensure the app meets the needs of end-users.

Find out more about the study

Exploring the experiences of people with dysphagia caused by stroke or Parkinson’s disease living at home and their caregivers

Do you have difficulty swallowing, or care for someone who does? Researchers from Griffith University are wanting to understand your experiences, to better understand how the needs of people with swallowing difficulties, known as dyshpagia, can be met by speech pathologists. If you agree to participate, you will be asked to complete a interview at a time and location convenient for you (e.g., in your own home) and to complete a small series of checklists that ask you questions about your swallowing difficulty severity, your quality of life, the impact swallowing difficulty has on your quality of life, and questions about how you are coping.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Better Individualised Stroke Care Using Technology (BISCUT)

The aim of this study is to co-design and build a stroke portal that will enable patients across Metro North Hospital and Health Services (MNHHS) to access a range of personal health information on their smart phone or tablet. The research team is seeking consumer engagement at the very early design phase to ensure the app meets the needs of end-users.

Find out more about the study

Exploring the experiences of people with dysphagia caused by stroke or Parkinson’s disease living at home and their caregivers

Do you have difficulty swallowing, or care for someone who does? Researchers from Griffith University are wanting to understand your experiences, to better understand how the needs of people with swallowing difficulties, known as dyshpagia, can be met by speech pathologists. If you agree to participate, you will be asked to complete a interview at a time and location convenient for you (e.g., in your own home) and to complete a small series of checklists that ask you questions about your swallowing difficulty severity, your quality of life, the impact swallowing difficulty has on your quality of life, and questions about how you are coping.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Targeting brain stimulation therapy in stroke

This study aims to determine whether the reliability of brain stimulation can be improved as a treatment for arm and hand function following stroke. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either real or sham brain stimluation plus an exercise program delivered for two weeks at home.

Find out more about the study

InTENSE Trial - Optimising upper limb recovery after stroke

This study aims to determine whether intensive, evidence-based upper limb movement training after anti-spasticity intervention (botulinum toxin-A injection) increases the amount of movement patients achieve in their arm and hand following stroke. After being assessed to determine they will benefit from an injection, patients are either given 12 weeks of regular intensive therapy at both in the hospital and at home, or a 12-week program to complete at home daily.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Targeting brain stimulation therapy in stroke

This study aims to determine whether the reliability of brain stimulation can be improved as a treatment for arm and hand function following stroke. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either real or sham brain stimluation plus an exercise program delivered for two weeks at home.

Find out more about the study

InTENSE Trial - Optimising upper limb recovery after stroke

This study aims to determine whether intensive, evidence-based upper limb movement training after anti-spasticity intervention (botulinum toxin-A injection) increases the amount of movement patients achieve in their arm and hand following stroke. After being assessed to determine they will benefit from an injection, patients are either given 12 weeks of regular intensive therapy at both in the hospital and at home, or a 12-week program to complete at home daily.

Find out more about the study

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The National Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The National Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Caring for those who care: A global survey of the health behaviours and health-related needs of informal caregivers

We are conducting an online global survey to investigate the prevalence of health risk behaviours and unmet needs of informal caregivers. Evidence from this study will inform the development of support programs and services to address health behaviours and unmet needs of informal caregivers internationally.

Find out more about the study

COMPARE – Constraint induced or multi-modal aphasia rehabilitation: an RCT of therapy for stroke related chronic aphasia

Following a stroke, some people find they have difficulty saying words and sentences. This language problem is called aphasia. This study aims to compare different treatments for people with problems talking after a stroke. We want to see if one treatment is better than the other, and to compare these treatments to usual speech pathology treatment.

Find out more about the study

Development of a sexuality intervention for stroke survivors and their partners

4 out of 5 Australian stroke survivors do not have the opportunity to discuss sexuality or receive information about sexuality. Sexuality is more than just about 'having sex', it also includes roles and identities, relationships and intimacy. Researchers from The University of Sydney would like to develop an educational package that can be provided to stroke survivors and partners of stroke survivors. The study aims to find out what topics should be included in this package and how it should be delivered. If you choose to participate you will be asked to complete two surveys about what you think is important for sexuality after stroke. Your responses are confidential and you will not be asked to share any information about your own experiences of sexuality.

Find out more about the study

Psychological recovery after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: the moderating effects of post-traumatic growth

Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) is a life-threatening type of haemorrhagic stroke, and people who have had an aSAH are at high risk of negative psychological outcomes. This study aims to find out if people who have had an aSAH can also experience post-traumatic growth, and whether this can help protect them from negative psychological outcomes. The study will involve a confidential online survey, with the option of a second in-depth interview conducted face-to-face or via telephone.

Find out more about the study

Telehealth delivery of memory rehabilitation following stroke

Compensatory memory rehabilitation has been shown to improve everyday memory. However, for many stroke survivors, access to rehab services is a challenge.

This study aims to establish the effectiveness of memory rehabilitation, delivered in-person and over the internet, making it the first study of its kind to investigate internet delivery for stroke survivors with memory difficulties.

If you would like further information please contact David Lawson on david.lawson@monash.edu

Survey of preference for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke

Investigators:
Dr. Feng Wang, A/Prof. Bruce C.V. Campbell, Prof. Stephen M. Davis,A/Prof. Bernard Yan

The Melbourne Brain Centre at the Royal Melbourne Hospital would like to invite stroke survivors, carers, family members and friends to participate in a survey focused on the preference for selection criteria of acute stroke treatment (also termed clot retrieval which is a way to remove clots in blocked brain arteries). Recent trials of clot retrieval for acute ischemic stroke demonstrated superior benefit of clot retrieval compared with intravenous thrombolysis alone when there is a major vessel occlusion. However, it remains unknown, which selection criteria should be used to select those patients. In this survey, we sought to evaluate the preferences for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke.  The results of the survey may inform decision-making and selection for clot retrieval.

The following instructions can guide you to complete the questionnaire step by step:

1. Please go to the questionnaire URL:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QK8LHQ8

2. Read the web-version questionnaire.

3. Complete the questions.

4. Press “Submit” bottom.

Join the Communication Research Registry

The Communication Research Registry is a national register of people who would like to be involved in communication research. This includes research that looks into speech and language difficulties post stroke. People with communication difficulties, their family and friends and members of the public are invited to join. Click here.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Caring for those who care: A global survey of the health behaviours and health-related needs of informal caregivers

We are conducting an online global survey to investigate the prevalence of health risk behaviours and unmet needs of informal caregivers. Evidence from this study will inform the development of support programs and services to address health behaviours and unmet needs of informal caregivers internationally.

Find out more about the study

COMPARE – Constraint induced or multi-modal aphasia rehabilitation: an RCT of therapy for stroke related chronic aphasia

Following a stroke, some people find they have difficulty saying words and sentences. This language problem is called aphasia. This study aims to compare different treatments for people with problems talking after a stroke. We want to see if one treatment is better than the other, and to compare these treatments to usual speech pathology treatment.

Find out more about the study

Development of a sexuality intervention for stroke survivors and their partners

4 out of 5 Australian stroke survivors do not have the opportunity to discuss sexuality or receive information about sexuality. Sexuality is more than just about 'having sex', it also includes roles and identities, relationships and intimacy. Researchers from The University of Sydney would like to develop an educational package that can be provided to stroke survivors and partners of stroke survivors. The study aims to find out what topics should be included in this package and how it should be delivered. If you choose to participate you will be asked to complete two surveys about what you think is important for sexuality after stroke. Your responses are confidential and you will not be asked to share any information about your own experiences of sexuality.

Find out more about the study

Psychological recovery after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: the moderating effects of post-traumatic growth

Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) is a life-threatening type of haemorrhagic stroke, and people who have had an aSAH are at high risk of negative psychological outcomes. This study aims to find out if people who have had an aSAH can also experience post-traumatic growth, and whether this can help protect them from negative psychological outcomes. The study will involve a confidential online survey, with the option of a second in-depth interview conducted face-to-face or via telephone.

Find out more about the study

Telehealth delivery of memory rehabilitation following stroke

Compensatory memory rehabilitation has been shown to improve everyday memory. However, for many stroke survivors, access to rehab services is a challenge.

This study aims to establish the effectiveness of memory rehabilitation, delivered in-person and over the internet, making it the first study of its kind to investigate internet delivery for stroke survivors with memory difficulties.

If you would like further information please contact David Lawson on david.lawson@monash.edu

Survey of preference for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke

Investigators:
Dr. Feng Wang, A/Prof. Bruce C.V. Campbell, Prof. Stephen M. Davis,A/Prof. Bernard Yan

The Melbourne Brain Centre at the Royal Melbourne Hospital would like to invite stroke survivors, carers, family members and friends to participate in a survey focused on the preference for selection criteria of acute stroke treatment (also termed clot retrieval which is a way to remove clots in blocked brain arteries). Recent trials of clot retrieval for acute ischemic stroke demonstrated superior benefit of clot retrieval compared with intravenous thrombolysis alone when there is a major vessel occlusion. However, it remains unknown, which selection criteria should be used to select those patients. In this survey, we sought to evaluate the preferences for selection criteria of clot retrieval in acute ischaemic stroke.  The results of the survey may inform decision-making and selection for clot retrieval.

The following instructions can guide you to complete the questionnaire step by step:

1. Please go to the questionnaire URL:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QK8LHQ8

2. Read the web-version questionnaire.

3. Complete the questions.

4. Press “Submit” bottom.

Join the Communication Research Registry

The Communication Research Registry is a national register of people who would like to be involved in communication research. This includes research that looks into speech and language difficulties post stroke. People with communication difficulties, their family and friends and members of the public are invited to join. Click here.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.