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Get involved in research

Survivors of stroke, families, carers and the community are central to stroke research.You can:

  • help direct research as part of the project team
  • share your views and experience
  • test new treatments to find out what works.

 

Getting involved in research may sometimes also allow you to access emerging therapy you wouldn’t otherwise be able to get. Involvement may also be part of your stroke recovery plan.

Stroke Foundation has an e-learning module to help you work well with stroke researchers.

Browse the list below to find projects relevant to you, in your area or online.

Palliative care workforce capabilities framework: consumer interviews

Queensland University of Technology is conducting research to establish a new consensus-based capability framework that spells out the skills and attributes that healthcare providers need in palliative care. We want to understand your experience and expectations, and make sure we don't miss things that are important to you and other people who require palliative care services. Participation will involve a group or individual interview online via the Zoom platform.

 

Carer-supported home exercise program to improve exercise participation for people after stroke

Researchers at the University of Tasmania are looking into exercise behaviour and exercise preferences of stroke survivors living at home, with the aim of developing a carer-supported exercise program that can be completed in your own home. It is important we get information from stroke survivors and carers themselves to make sure the developed program is targeting your needs. The survey may take around 15 minutes to complete. The survey results will be anonymous and completely confidential.

 

Perispinal Etanercept to improve Stroke Outcomes (PESTO) clinical trial

Funded by the Federal Government through the Medical Research Future Fund, Australia’s first multi-centred international clinical trial of perispinal etanercept in chronic stroke is actively recruiting participants. This trial seeks to determine if perispinal etanercept improves quality of life in working age survivors of stroke with a moderate to severe disability, and if repeated treatments lead to more improvement compared to one treatment. Australian sites are located in Melbourne, Victoria. We understand that interstate travel can be challenging, and we take the time to ensure that anyone who is interested and eligible makes an informed decision about participating.

 

Supporting Young Stroke Survivors Through Engaging Messaging (SYSSTEM)

Researchers from the University of Tasmania are studying how technology can support participation and quality of life for young stroke survivors while reducing the development of secondary chronic diseases. The team is looking for young stroke survivors (18–30 years) in Australia who had a stroke when they were < 25 years; caregivers of these young stroke survivors; and health care professionals with at least 12 months of experience working with young stroke survivors. Participation will involve one-on-one interviews or focus groups depending on preference, and will take 30–90 minutes via zoom or telephone.

 

Stroke survivors’ preferences for recovery-promoting drugs

My name is Nerida Firth, and I am a pharmacist and PhD student from James Cook University (Townsville), investigating medicines that might promote stroke recovery. We are looking for people over 18 years of age, who live in Australia and have had a stroke, to take a survey about whether you would take recovery-promoting medications. The survey will take about 20 minutes to complete.

 

Development of a core outcome set for clinical research on interventions for speech impairments in stroke

This study aims to gain consensus around what aspects of speech recovery after stroke are important to measure. The research team are looking for survivors of stroke who have had or still have dysarthria, and researchers and clinicians who have experienced, or worked with people who have experienced, dysarthria after stroke. Participation involves two 30–45 minute online surveys, and an online (Zoom) meeting.

 

Stroke survivors’ experiences: access to information and services during recovery

This project from Flinders University is investigating the information and services stroke survivors in Australia have received, and what community and clinical supports you are currently using. The research team would also like to understand what would have been helpful for you. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes to complete.

 

Exploring ways to support exercise and activity in stroke recovery

Researchers from Flinders University are looking for survivors of stroke to interview online and share some information about themselves and the exercise and activities they do, including what makes it easier or more difficult to exercise. The researchers will show you an app that can be used to support exercise and ask you to share your thoughts about the app. The online interview will take around 40–60 minutes, and you will receive a $25 gift voucher for participation.

 

Dysphagia telerehabilitation program for stroke survivors living in the community

This research study from the University of Sydney is about swallowing therapy via telehealth. Taking part in this study is voluntary. The research team are inviting people who had a stroke more than 6 months ago and have swallowing difficulties to participate.

 

Preventing Stroke Research Priorities Project

This project from the University of Tasmania aims to identify a Top 10 list of questions the community and clinicians want answered about preventing stroke. The first step in this project was an online survey asking what questions people have about preventing stroke. We have narrowed the questions down to a shorter list, and we now invite people to let us know how important you think these unanswered questions about preventing stroke are. The survey will take about 15–20 minutes and is completely anonymous.

 

Validation of the Australian Eating Survey for stroke survivors

This study from the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) and the University of Newcastle aims to find out how accurately a survey can tell us what stroke survivors eat. Anyone who is over 18 years old, has experienced a stroke and lives at home in Australia is invited to participate. Participation involves completing the online Australian Eating Survey plus a weighed record of everything you eat or drink for 3 days.

 

Subjective experience of barriers and facilitators of accessing mental health treatment after stroke: a qualitative study

Researchers from Monash University are seeking people who have experienced mood problems (e.g., depression, anxiety) after stroke. Participants will take part in an interview either face-to-face or by videoconferencing, and a researcher will ask questions about mood problems, experience of seeking professional and/or informal support, and pre-existing knowledge or assumptions about mental health treatment. This is a chance to share your experience and help us understand what can be done to improve rehabilitation and care of stroke survivors. You will be reimbursed for your time ($50).

 

Feasibility and effects of novel light therapy in individuals with neurological conditions (stroke)

The study from Edith Cowan University aims to evaluate the feasibility and therapeutic effects of light therapy in combination with sleep health, compared to sleep health alone, in individuals experiencing post-stroke fatigue at least 3 months following a stroke. Eligible participants will be randomly assigned to receive light therapy with sleep health guidance, or sleep health guidance alone, for a 4-week period. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires and wear an activity monitor prior to the commencement of the intervention, immediately following the intervention period and four weeks following the intervention period to evaluate fatigue, sleep health, mood and quality of life.

 

UPLIFT trial: Integrated UPper limb and Language Impairment and Functional Training after stroke

Do you have difficulty using your arm and communicating after your stroke? The UPLIFT trial is recruiting people who are 3 to 24 months post-stroke and living in the community to test a new intensive rehabilitation program that trains arm movement and communication together. Depending on the amount of function you have, the program will be provided at home via telerehabilitation, or in person at a health clinic.

 

Experiences of sexuality post stroke in LGBTQI+ persons and their partners

Researchers from the University of Sydney are conducting a research study about the effects of stroke on relationships, intimacy and sexuality on LGBTQI+ stroke survivors and their partners. Taking part in the study involves an interview with the researcher that can be completed via Zoom (video conferencing).

 

Lived-experience experts for the study ‘Patient preferences for upper limb therapy following stroke’

Researchers from St Vincent's Health Network Sydney are seeking stroke survivors to join their team looking at people's preferences regarding constraint-induced movement therapy for arm recovery following stroke. It is well established that when patient preferences for treatment are taken into account, uptake and compliance improves, leading to better health outcomes and improved cost effectiveness. The research team are planning to investigate patient preferences for arm rehabilitation using a discrete choice experiment, and they are seeking to engage with a stroke survivor or survivors with an interest in this topic to join the research team as lived experience expert(s).

 

Antiplatelet Secondary Prevention International Randomised trial after INtracerebral haemorrhage (ASPIRING trial)

The ASPIRING trial aims to determine if single antiplatelet (blood-thinning) medication after a bleed (haemorrhage) in the brain is of net benefit in preventing all future serious vascular events (caused by blood clots in blood vessels, or bleeding from them). Survivors of brain haemorrhage who are interested in participating will be asked to discuss their participation with their doctor, before being randomly allocated to either taking or avoiding antiplatelet therapy. Trial participation is for 4 years, with telephone assessments by the trial coordinating centre in Perth WA at 1, 3, and 6 months after randomisation and then 6-monthly.

 

FoCCuS4HEART: Female Carers Co-produce Support 4 Heart and Emotional health to Address Risk facTors

Phase 1: a survey of the health behaviours and emotional health among female carers of stroke survivors. Researchers from the University of Newcastle are conducting the FoCCuS4HEART project, which seeks to work with informal female carers of stroke survivors to develop strategies and tools to support carers to self-manage their emotional and physical health. If you’re a woman who provides care or has provided care to someone who has had a stroke, you can help by sharing your experiences in our online survey.

 

Development of a sexuality intervention for stroke survivors and their partners

4 out of 5 Australian stroke survivors do not have the opportunity to discuss sexuality or receive information about sexuality. Sexuality is more than just about 'having sex', it also includes roles and identities, relationships and intimacy. Researchers from The University of Sydney would like to develop an educational package that can be provided to stroke survivors and partners of stroke survivors. The study aims to find out what topics should be included in this package and how it should be delivered. If you choose to participate you will be asked to complete two surveys about what you think is important for sexuality after stroke. Your responses are confidential and you will not be asked to share any information about your own experiences of sexuality.

 

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Palliative care workforce capabilities framework: consumer interviews

Queensland University of Technology is conducting research to establish a new consensus-based capability framework that spells out the skills and attributes that healthcare providers need in palliative care. We want to understand your experience and expectations, and make sure we don't miss things that are important to you and other people who require palliative care services. Participation will involve a group or individual interview online via the Zoom platform.

 

Carer-supported home exercise program to improve exercise participation for people after stroke

Researchers at the University of Tasmania are looking into exercise behaviour and exercise preferences of stroke survivors living at home, with the aim of developing a carer-supported exercise program that can be completed in your own home. It is important we get information from stroke survivors and carers themselves to make sure the developed program is targeting your needs. The survey may take around 15 minutes to complete. The survey results will be anonymous and completely confidential.

 

Perispinal Etanercept to improve Stroke Outcomes (PESTO) clinical trial

Funded by the Federal Government through the Medical Research Future Fund, Australia’s first multi-centred international clinical trial of perispinal etanercept in chronic stroke is actively recruiting participants. This trial seeks to determine if perispinal etanercept improves quality of life in working age survivors of stroke with a moderate to severe disability, and if repeated treatments lead to more improvement compared to one treatment. Australian sites are located in Melbourne, Victoria. We understand that interstate travel can be challenging, and we take the time to ensure that anyone who is interested and eligible makes an informed decision about participating.

 

Supporting Young Stroke Survivors Through Engaging Messaging (SYSSTEM)

Researchers from the University of Tasmania are studying how technology can support participation and quality of life for young stroke survivors while reducing the development of secondary chronic diseases. The team is looking for young stroke survivors (18–30 years) in Australia who had a stroke when they were < 25 years; caregivers of these young stroke survivors; and health care professionals with at least 12 months of experience working with young stroke survivors. Participation will involve one-on-one interviews or focus groups depending on preference, and will take 30–90 minutes via zoom or telephone.

 

Stroke survivors’ preferences for recovery-promoting drugs

My name is Nerida Firth, and I am a pharmacist and PhD student from James Cook University (Townsville), investigating medicines that might promote stroke recovery. We are looking for people over 18 years of age, who live in Australia and have had a stroke, to take a survey about whether you would take recovery-promoting medications. The survey will take about 20 minutes to complete.

 

Development of a core outcome set for clinical research on interventions for speech impairments in stroke

This study aims to gain consensus around what aspects of speech recovery after stroke are important to measure. The research team are looking for survivors of stroke who have had or still have dysarthria, and researchers and clinicians who have experienced, or worked with people who have experienced, dysarthria after stroke. Participation involves two 30–45 minute online surveys, and an online (Zoom) meeting.

 

Stroke survivors’ experiences: access to information and services during recovery

This project from Flinders University is investigating the information and services stroke survivors in Australia have received, and what community and clinical supports you are currently using. The research team would also like to understand what would have been helpful for you. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes to complete.

 

Exploring ways to support exercise and activity in stroke recovery

Researchers from Flinders University are looking for survivors of stroke to interview online and share some information about themselves and the exercise and activities they do, including what makes it easier or more difficult to exercise. The researchers will show you an app that can be used to support exercise and ask you to share your thoughts about the app. The online interview will take around 40–60 minutes, and you will receive a $25 gift voucher for participation.

 

Dysphagia telerehabilitation program for stroke survivors living in the community

This research study from the University of Sydney is about swallowing therapy via telehealth. Taking part in this study is voluntary. The research team are inviting people who had a stroke more than 6 months ago and have swallowing difficulties to participate.

 

Preventing Stroke Research Priorities Project

This project from the University of Tasmania aims to identify a Top 10 list of questions the community and clinicians want answered about preventing stroke. The first step in this project was an online survey asking what questions people have about preventing stroke. We have narrowed the questions down to a shorter list, and we now invite people to let us know how important you think these unanswered questions about preventing stroke are. The survey will take about 15–20 minutes and is completely anonymous.

 

Validation of the Australian Eating Survey for stroke survivors

This study from the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) and the University of Newcastle aims to find out how accurately a survey can tell us what stroke survivors eat. Anyone who is over 18 years old, has experienced a stroke and lives at home in Australia is invited to participate. Participation involves completing the online Australian Eating Survey plus a weighed record of everything you eat or drink for 3 days.

 

Subjective experience of barriers and facilitators of accessing mental health treatment after stroke: a qualitative study

Researchers from Monash University are seeking people who have experienced mood problems (e.g., depression, anxiety) after stroke. Participants will take part in an interview either face-to-face or by videoconferencing, and a researcher will ask questions about mood problems, experience of seeking professional and/or informal support, and pre-existing knowledge or assumptions about mental health treatment. This is a chance to share your experience and help us understand what can be done to improve rehabilitation and care of stroke survivors. You will be reimbursed for your time ($50).

 

Feasibility and effects of novel light therapy in individuals with neurological conditions (stroke)

The study from Edith Cowan University aims to evaluate the feasibility and therapeutic effects of light therapy in combination with sleep health, compared to sleep health alone, in individuals experiencing post-stroke fatigue at least 3 months following a stroke. Eligible participants will be randomly assigned to receive light therapy with sleep health guidance, or sleep health guidance alone, for a 4-week period. Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires and wear an activity monitor prior to the commencement of the intervention, immediately following the intervention period and four weeks following the intervention period to evaluate fatigue, sleep health, mood and quality of life.

 

UPLIFT trial: Integrated UPper limb and Language Impairment and Functional Training after stroke

Do you have difficulty using your arm and communicating after your stroke? The UPLIFT trial is recruiting people who are 3 to 24 months post-stroke and living in the community to test a new intensive rehabilitation program that trains arm movement and communication together. Depending on the amount of function you have, the program will be provided at home via telerehabilitation, or in person at a health clinic.

 

Experiences of sexuality post stroke in LGBTQI+ persons and their partners

Researchers from the University of Sydney are conducting a research study about the effects of stroke on relationships, intimacy and sexuality on LGBTQI+ stroke survivors and their partners. Taking part in the study involves an interview with the researcher that can be completed via Zoom (video conferencing).

 

Lived-experience experts for the study ‘Patient preferences for upper limb therapy following stroke’

Researchers from St Vincent's Health Network Sydney are seeking stroke survivors to join their team looking at people's preferences regarding constraint-induced movement therapy for arm recovery following stroke. It is well established that when patient preferences for treatment are taken into account, uptake and compliance improves, leading to better health outcomes and improved cost effectiveness. The research team are planning to investigate patient preferences for arm rehabilitation using a discrete choice experiment, and they are seeking to engage with a stroke survivor or survivors with an interest in this topic to join the research team as lived experience expert(s).

 

Antiplatelet Secondary Prevention International Randomised trial after INtracerebral haemorrhage (ASPIRING trial)

The ASPIRING trial aims to determine if single antiplatelet (blood-thinning) medication after a bleed (haemorrhage) in the brain is of net benefit in preventing all future serious vascular events (caused by blood clots in blood vessels, or bleeding from them). Survivors of brain haemorrhage who are interested in participating will be asked to discuss their participation with their doctor, before being randomly allocated to either taking or avoiding antiplatelet therapy. Trial participation is for 4 years, with telephone assessments by the trial coordinating centre in Perth WA at 1, 3, and 6 months after randomisation and then 6-monthly.

 

FoCCuS4HEART: Female Carers Co-produce Support 4 Heart and Emotional health to Address Risk facTors

Phase 1: a survey of the health behaviours and emotional health among female carers of stroke survivors. Researchers from the University of Newcastle are conducting the FoCCuS4HEART project, which seeks to work with informal female carers of stroke survivors to develop strategies and tools to support carers to self-manage their emotional and physical health. If you’re a woman who provides care or has provided care to someone who has had a stroke, you can help by sharing your experiences in our online survey.

 

Development of a sexuality intervention for stroke survivors and their partners

4 out of 5 Australian stroke survivors do not have the opportunity to discuss sexuality or receive information about sexuality. Sexuality is more than just about 'having sex', it also includes roles and identities, relationships and intimacy. Researchers from The University of Sydney would like to develop an educational package that can be provided to stroke survivors and partners of stroke survivors. The study aims to find out what topics should be included in this package and how it should be delivered. If you choose to participate you will be asked to complete two surveys about what you think is important for sexuality after stroke. Your responses are confidential and you will not be asked to share any information about your own experiences of sexuality.

 

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Falls after stroke trial

The Falls After Stroke Trial (FAST) is testing a novel at-home exercise and safety training program. It aims to reduce your risk of falling and increase your ability to do daily activities. The research team seeks people in Canberra, Sydney or Melbourne who have had a stroke in the last 5 years, are aged over 50 years and can walk 10 metres (with or without a walking aid). The intervention involves an exercise program which requires no extra time during the day.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Falls after stroke trial

The Falls After Stroke Trial (FAST) is testing a novel at-home exercise and safety training program. It aims to reduce your risk of falling and increase your ability to do daily activities. The research team seeks people in Canberra, Sydney or Melbourne who have had a stroke in the last 5 years, are aged over 50 years and can walk 10 metres (with or without a walking aid). The intervention involves an exercise program which requires no extra time during the day.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Culturally and linguistically diverse aphasia rehabilitation: the experiences of people with aphasia and interpreters

We want to use your experiences to design solutions for better rehabilitation and better services for diverse people with aphasia.

We want to interview you if: you have aphasia after a stroke, you speak a language other than English, and you or your parent/s were born overseas.

A speech pathologist will interview you with the help of an interpreter. The interview will take about one hour. The interview will be video recorded.

The interview can be done at your home. Or it can be at Concord Hospital (in Sydney). If we cannot meet face-to-face, we might interview you in a Zoom video-call.

 

Validation of the Nine Hole Peg Test administered via telehealth with stroke survivors

Are you a survivor of stroke, based in Sydney or Melbourne, with ongoing challenges using your affected hand? This study from St Vincent's Health Network will examine the administration of assessments for the hand and arm via telehealth. Participants can be seen either at home, or onsite in Auburn, Melbourne or Darlinghurst, Sydney.

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

 

Falls after stroke trial

The Falls After Stroke Trial (FAST) is testing a novel at-home exercise and safety training program. It aims to reduce your risk of falling and increase your ability to do daily activities. The research team seeks people in Sydney, Canberra or Melbourne who have had a stroke in the last 5 years, are aged over 50 years and can walk 10 metres (with or without a walking aid). The intervention involves an exercise program which requires no extra time during the day.

 

Improving arm function after stroke using task-specific training

Many people who experience a stroke have difficulty moving their arm and hand, and research has shown that people can still have non-functional arms at 6 months after stroke. Our researchers are conducting a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial to test whether a programme of specific training exercises is more effective than usual care. We are seeking people with stroke who have difficulty using their arm and/or hand to take part in this study. The study will involve assessments of arm and hand function before and after a 6 week period, with a follow-up assessment after 6 months.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Culturally and linguistically diverse aphasia rehabilitation: the experiences of people with aphasia and interpreters

We want to use your experiences to design solutions for better rehabilitation and better services for diverse people with aphasia.

We want to interview you if: you have aphasia after a stroke, you speak a language other than English, and you or your parent/s were born overseas.

A speech pathologist will interview you with the help of an interpreter. The interview will take about one hour. The interview will be video recorded.

The interview can be done at your home. Or it can be at Concord Hospital (in Sydney). If we cannot meet face-to-face, we might interview you in a Zoom video-call.

 

Validation of the Nine Hole Peg Test administered via telehealth with stroke survivors

Are you a survivor of stroke, based in Sydney or Melbourne, with ongoing challenges using your affected hand? This study from St Vincent's Health Network will examine the administration of assessments for the hand and arm via telehealth. Participants can be seen either at home, or onsite in Auburn, Melbourne or Darlinghurst, Sydney.

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

 

Falls after stroke trial

The Falls After Stroke Trial (FAST) is testing a novel at-home exercise and safety training program. It aims to reduce your risk of falling and increase your ability to do daily activities. The research team seeks people in Sydney, Canberra or Melbourne who have had a stroke in the last 5 years, are aged over 50 years and can walk 10 metres (with or without a walking aid). The intervention involves an exercise program which requires no extra time during the day.

 

Improving arm function after stroke using task-specific training

Many people who experience a stroke have difficulty moving their arm and hand, and research has shown that people can still have non-functional arms at 6 months after stroke. Our researchers are conducting a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial to test whether a programme of specific training exercises is more effective than usual care. We are seeking people with stroke who have difficulty using their arm and/or hand to take part in this study. The study will involve assessments of arm and hand function before and after a 6 week period, with a follow-up assessment after 6 months.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

There are currently no research projects listed for the Northern Territory. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

There are currently no research projects listed for the Northern Territory. Please check the National tab for projects recruiting Australia-wide.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Impact of a clinically led innovation of the electronic medical record for stroke on interprofessional practice

A team of researchers from the University of Queensland and Queensland Health are seeking consumer feedback to assist in co-designing an education package for stroke team staff. Consumers can highlight what is important to them about the team working together. Participation involves an interview or focus group (~30 minutes) online or via phone. You are eligible if you are a stroke survivor, or carer/relative of a stroke survivor, who was cared for in a Queensland public hospital and health service (Queensland Health).

 

UPLIFT trial: Integrated UPper limb and Language Impairment and Functional Training after stroke

Do you have difficulty using your arm and communicating after your stroke? The UPLIFT trial is recruiting people who are 3 to 24 months post-stroke and living in the community to test a new intensive rehabilitation program that trains arm movement and communication together. Depending on the amount of function you have, the program will be provided at home via telerehabilitation, or in person at a health clinic.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Impact of a clinically led innovation of the electronic medical record for stroke on interprofessional practice

A team of researchers from the University of Queensland and Queensland Health are seeking consumer feedback to assist in co-designing an education package for stroke team staff. Consumers can highlight what is important to them about the team working together. Participation involves an interview or focus group (~30 minutes) online or via phone. You are eligible if you are a stroke survivor, or carer/relative of a stroke survivor, who was cared for in a Queensland public hospital and health service (Queensland Health).

 

UPLIFT trial: Integrated UPper limb and Language Impairment and Functional Training after stroke

Do you have difficulty using your arm and communicating after your stroke? The UPLIFT trial is recruiting people who are 3 to 24 months post-stroke and living in the community to test a new intensive rehabilitation program that trains arm movement and communication together. Depending on the amount of function you have, the program will be provided at home via telerehabilitation, or in person at a health clinic.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Brain stimulation for post-stroke aphasia

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a method to increase activity of the brain after stroke. This technique is safe and non-invasive, and has shown early promising results as a treatment for aphasia, but we need further experiments to understand its physiological and behavioural effects. We are looking for participants within the Greater Adelaide area to attend 3 in-person sessions at the University of Adelaide, 2 of which will involve rTMS.

 

Establishing an intensive, high dose, stroke recovery student-led clinic to improve upper limb outcomes

This research from the University of South Australia is exploring new ways of delivering stroke rehabilitation so that people in the community can access high-quality health care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a burst of intensive training for arm recovery. People who have experienced a stroke and whose arm has not fully recovered are invited to participate in a total of 90 hours of therapy over a 5-week period.

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

 

Can restorative brain-computer interfaces improve hand motor functions after a stroke?

This study is investigating whether neurofeedback training can improve hand movement after stroke. Participation involves attending 20 sessions at the University of Adelaide, during which participants imagine they extend their fingers and receive actual finger extension via a bionic hand involved with their fingers. People who have had a stroke at least 6 months ago, are able to understand auditory commands presented in English, and are independently mobile are invited to take part.

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Brain stimulation for post-stroke aphasia

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a method to increase activity of the brain after stroke. This technique is safe and non-invasive, and has shown early promising results as a treatment for aphasia, but we need further experiments to understand its physiological and behavioural effects. We are looking for participants within the Greater Adelaide area to attend 3 in-person sessions at the University of Adelaide, 2 of which will involve rTMS.

 

Establishing an intensive, high dose, stroke recovery student-led clinic to improve upper limb outcomes

This research from the University of South Australia is exploring new ways of delivering stroke rehabilitation so that people in the community can access high-quality health care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a burst of intensive training for arm recovery. People who have experienced a stroke and whose arm has not fully recovered are invited to participate in a total of 90 hours of therapy over a 5-week period.

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

 

Can restorative brain-computer interfaces improve hand motor functions after a stroke?

This study is investigating whether neurofeedback training can improve hand movement after stroke. Participation involves attending 20 sessions at the University of Adelaide, during which participants imagine they extend their fingers and receive actual finger extension via a bionic hand involved with their fingers. People who have had a stroke at least 6 months ago, are able to understand auditory commands presented in English, and are independently mobile are invited to take part.

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

PERsonalised Knowledge to reduce the risk of Stroke (PERKS-International)

This study is looking for people in Hobart who haven’t had a stroke, to compare two different ways of showing them their risk factors, which are things like diet, exercise and blood pressure. Knowing these lifestyle risk factors may help people to control them and reduce their risk of having a stroke. Participation will involve four online surveys and two face-to-face health checks.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

PERsonalised Knowledge to reduce the risk of Stroke (PERKS-International)

This study is looking for people in Hobart who haven’t had a stroke, to compare two different ways of showing them their risk factors, which are things like diet, exercise and blood pressure. Knowing these lifestyle risk factors may help people to control them and reduce their risk of having a stroke. Participation will involve four online surveys and two face-to-face health checks.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Falls after stroke trial

The Falls After Stroke Trial (FAST) is testing a novel at-home exercise and safety training program. It aims to reduce your risk of falling and increase your ability to do daily activities. The research team seeks people in Melbourne, Sydney or Canberra who have had a stroke in the last 5 years, are aged over 50 years and can walk 10 metres (with or without a walking aid). The intervention involves an exercise program which requires no extra time during the day.

 

Culturally and linguistically diverse aphasia rehabilitation: the experiences of people with aphasia and interpreters

We want to use your experiences to design solutions for better rehabilitation and better services for diverse people with aphasia.

We want to interview you if: you have aphasia after a stroke, you speak a language other than English, and you or your parent/s were born overseas.

A speech pathologist will interview you with the help of an interpreter. The interview will take about one hour. The interview will be video recorded.

The interview can be done at your home. Or it can be at Concord Hospital (in Sydney). If we cannot meet face-to-face, we might interview you in a Zoom video-call.

 

Fit 4 Me After Stroke

Regular physical activity is important for stroke recovery, reducing chances of another stroke, and keeping you healthy and strong! This phase I/IIA clinical trial from the University of Melbourne aims to find out how long you need to be active for each week and how hard you have to work while active to be beneficial for your health. We are looking for volunteers who are over 18 years old, have had a stroke within the past 6 months, and can walk with or without a gait aid. Health professionals will give you a personalised physical activity program and support you over 6 months. You will be given a Fitbit device to monitor and help support your physical activity.

 

Support After Stroke using group-based classeS: The SASS Study

Researchers from Monash University have developed two group-based programs to improve recovery for people living with stroke including brain connectivity and function, mood, quality of life, stress, blood pressure and blood glucose. To test these aspects, they are looking for people in south-east/eastern suburbs of Melbourne who have had a stroke in the last 3 to 12 months. The program involves a baseline health assessment, followed by a weekly 60-min class for 12 weeks.

 

Validation of the Nine Hole Peg Test administered via telehealth with stroke survivors

Are you a survivor of stroke, based in Sydney or Melbourne, with ongoing challenges using your affected hand? This study from St Vincent's Health Network will examine the administration of assessments for the hand and arm via telehealth. Participants can be seen either at home, or onsite in Auburn, Melbourne or Darlinghurst, Sydney.

 

UPLIFT trial: Integrated UPper limb and Language Impairment and Functional Training after stroke

Do you have difficulty using your arm and communicating after your stroke? The UPLIFT trial is recruiting people who are 3 to 24 months post-stroke and living in the community to test a new intensive rehabilitation program that trains arm movement and communication together. Depending on the amount of function you have, the program will be provided at home via telerehabilitation, or in person at a health clinic.

 

PERsonalised Knowledge to reduce the risk of Stroke (PERKS-International)

This study is looking for people in Melbourne (Clayton) who haven’t had a stroke, to compare two different ways of showing them their risk factors, which are things like diet, exercise and blood pressure. Knowing these lifestyle risk factors may help people to control them and reduce their risk of having a stroke. Participation will involve four online surveys and two face-to-face health checks.

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

 

Perispinal Etanercept to improve Stroke Outcomes (PESTO) clinical trial

Funded by the Federal Government through the Medical Research Future Fund, Australia’s first multi-centred international clinical trial of perispinal etanercept in chronic stroke is actively recruiting participants. This trial seeks to determine if perispinal etanercept improves quality of life in working age survivors of stroke with a moderate to severe disability, and if repeated treatments lead to more improvement compared to one treatment. Australian sites are located in Melbourne, Victoria. We understand that interstate travel is particularly challenging at the moment, and we take the time to ensure that anyone who is interested and eligible makes an informed decision about participating.

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

 

Improving arm function after stroke using task-specific training

Many people who experience a stroke have difficulty moving their arm and hand, and research has shown that people can still have non-functional arms at 6 months after stroke. Our researchers are conducting a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial to test whether a programme of specific training exercises is more effective than usual care. We are seeking people with stroke who have difficulty using their arm and/or hand to take part in this study. The study will involve assessments of arm and hand function before and after a 6 week period, with a follow-up assessment after 6 months.

 

Improving wellbeing after acquired brain injury with a group program to enhance participation in valued activities

Have you had a stroke or acquired brain injury (ABI) that has affected how you think and feel? Are you interested in learning ways to deal with these changes so you can do more of the things you value in life? Difficulties with memory and other thinking skills, along with changes in mood, can affect the capacity to do things that are meaningful and valued, such as work, leisure and social activities. VaLiANT is an 8-week group program located at La Trobe University in Bundoora (VIC), or run via telehealth (Zoom videoconferencing) during periods of Covid-related restrictions. Adults (aged 18 years or over) who have had a stroke at least 3 months ago can participate. The program is designed to increase your participation in activities that you value while helping you learn strategies for dealing with changes in thinking and mood. You are invited to participate in our research investigating the impact of participating in the group on the lives of people with ABI.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Falls after stroke trial

The Falls After Stroke Trial (FAST) is testing a novel at-home exercise and safety training program. It aims to reduce your risk of falling and increase your ability to do daily activities. The research team seeks people in Melbourne, Sydney or Canberra who have had a stroke in the last 5 years, are aged over 50 years and can walk 10 metres (with or without a walking aid). The intervention involves an exercise program which requires no extra time during the day.

 

Culturally and linguistically diverse aphasia rehabilitation: the experiences of people with aphasia and interpreters

We want to use your experiences to design solutions for better rehabilitation and better services for diverse people with aphasia.

We want to interview you if: you have aphasia after a stroke, you speak a language other than English, and you or your parent/s were born overseas.

A speech pathologist will interview you with the help of an interpreter. The interview will take about one hour. The interview will be video recorded.

The interview can be done at your home. Or it can be at Concord Hospital (in Sydney). If we cannot meet face-to-face, we might interview you in a Zoom video-call.

 

Fit 4 Me After Stroke

Regular physical activity is important for stroke recovery, reducing chances of another stroke, and keeping you healthy and strong! This phase I/IIA clinical trial from the University of Melbourne aims to find out how long you need to be active for each week and how hard you have to work while active to be beneficial for your health. We are looking for volunteers who are over 18 years old, have had a stroke within the past 6 months, and can walk with or without a gait aid. Health professionals will give you a personalised physical activity program and support you over 6 months. You will be given a Fitbit device to monitor and help support your physical activity.

 

Support After Stroke using group-based classeS: The SASS Study

Researchers from Monash University have developed two group-based programs to improve recovery for people living with stroke including brain connectivity and function, mood, quality of life, stress, blood pressure and blood glucose. To test these aspects, they are looking for people in south-east/eastern suburbs of Melbourne who have had a stroke in the last 3 to 12 months. The program involves a baseline health assessment, followed by a weekly 60-min class for 12 weeks.

 

Validation of the Nine Hole Peg Test administered via telehealth with stroke survivors

Are you a survivor of stroke, based in Sydney or Melbourne, with ongoing challenges using your affected hand? This study from St Vincent's Health Network will examine the administration of assessments for the hand and arm via telehealth. Participants can be seen either at home, or onsite in Auburn, Melbourne or Darlinghurst, Sydney.

 

UPLIFT trial: Integrated UPper limb and Language Impairment and Functional Training after stroke

Do you have difficulty using your arm and communicating after your stroke? The UPLIFT trial is recruiting people who are 3 to 24 months post-stroke and living in the community to test a new intensive rehabilitation program that trains arm movement and communication together. Depending on the amount of function you have, the program will be provided at home via telerehabilitation, or in person at a health clinic.

 

PERsonalised Knowledge to reduce the risk of Stroke (PERKS-International)

This study is looking for people in Melbourne (Clayton) who haven’t had a stroke, to compare two different ways of showing them their risk factors, which are things like diet, exercise and blood pressure. Knowing these lifestyle risk factors may help people to control them and reduce their risk of having a stroke. Participation will involve four online surveys and two face-to-face health checks.

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

 

Perispinal Etanercept to improve Stroke Outcomes (PESTO) clinical trial

Funded by the Federal Government through the Medical Research Future Fund, Australia’s first multi-centred international clinical trial of perispinal etanercept in chronic stroke is actively recruiting participants. This trial seeks to determine if perispinal etanercept improves quality of life in working age survivors of stroke with a moderate to severe disability, and if repeated treatments lead to more improvement compared to one treatment. Australian sites are located in Melbourne, Victoria. We understand that interstate travel is particularly challenging at the moment, and we take the time to ensure that anyone who is interested and eligible makes an informed decision about participating.

 

Network of sites and 'up-skilled' therapists to deliver best-practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb

We are recruiting people with stroke who would like to participate in a therapy program that focuses on touch sensation and use of the hand. Potential participants should be adults (over 18 years of age) who have had a stroke and have altered feeling in their hand. Participants in the study will be asked to attend assessment and therapy appointments 14 times over a period of six months.

 

Improving arm function after stroke using task-specific training

Many people who experience a stroke have difficulty moving their arm and hand, and research has shown that people can still have non-functional arms at 6 months after stroke. Our researchers are conducting a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial to test whether a programme of specific training exercises is more effective than usual care. We are seeking people with stroke who have difficulty using their arm and/or hand to take part in this study. The study will involve assessments of arm and hand function before and after a 6 week period, with a follow-up assessment after 6 months.

 

Improving wellbeing after acquired brain injury with a group program to enhance participation in valued activities

Have you had a stroke or acquired brain injury (ABI) that has affected how you think and feel? Are you interested in learning ways to deal with these changes so you can do more of the things you value in life? Difficulties with memory and other thinking skills, along with changes in mood, can affect the capacity to do things that are meaningful and valued, such as work, leisure and social activities. VaLiANT is an 8-week group program located at La Trobe University in Bundoora (VIC), or run via telehealth (Zoom videoconferencing) during periods of Covid-related restrictions. Adults (aged 18 years or over) who have had a stroke at least 3 months ago can participate. The program is designed to increase your participation in activities that you value while helping you learn strategies for dealing with changes in thinking and mood. You are invited to participate in our research investigating the impact of participating in the group on the lives of people with ABI.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Environment enrichment for young stroke survivors

Help young stroke survivors to improve their quality of life by improving cognitive function. This study from Edith Cowan University is evaluating cognitive treatment with an Environment Enrichment program that includes physical exercise, nutrition, and sleep guidance. Participation will involve an exercise stress test and cognitive assessments, followed by a 12-week intervention period with personalised telehealth guidance.

 

UPLIFT trial: Integrated UPper limb and Language Impairment and Functional Training after stroke

Do you have difficulty using your arm and communicating after your stroke? The UPLIFT trial is recruiting people who are 3 to 24 months post-stroke and living in the community to test a new intensive rehabilitation program that trains arm movement and communication together. Depending on the amount of function you have, the program will be provided at home via telerehabilitation, or in person at a health clinic.

 

Improving arm function with a virtual dolphin

This research project from Edith Cowan University aims to use modern gaming technology to improve arm function, mood and cognition. In this project you submerge in a virtual underwater world and control a virtual dolphin with your arm. Anti-gravity support will be provided by an exoskeleton, which supports your arms so you can move freely. The study is designed for people who have arm weakness (hemiparesis) because of their stroke, which occurred more than 6 months ago. You will be offered 20 free training sessions over the course of 7 weeks.

 

Pilot study of a group therapy program for individuals with emotion dysregulation after an acquired brain injury

Following a brain injury, there are many reasons that you may have difficulty regulating your emotions, including injury to emotion centres in the brain and/or due to the effect of major life changes you have experienced as a result of your injury. The ER-ABI group program will introduce a range of strategies to help you to better understand and regulate your emotions. The group is designed for people who have sustained an acquired brain injury in the last 24 months (at the time of commencement of the group). Each group consists of eight weekly two-hour sessions and one follow-up session.

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

 

The relationship between thinking skills and daily functioning in adults with brain injuries

The University of Western Australia is researching how thinking skills following a brain injury like stroke affect how well people can do things such as work or hobbies. Participants will need to attend the University of Western Australia in Perth to have an assessment and complete questionnaires and tests, and attend a follow-up in three months’ time. Case managers or partners will also be invited to participate. A report about how participants went can be provided on request.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Environment enrichment for young stroke survivors

Help young stroke survivors to improve their quality of life by improving cognitive function. This study from Edith Cowan University is evaluating cognitive treatment with an Environment Enrichment program that includes physical exercise, nutrition, and sleep guidance. Participation will involve an exercise stress test and cognitive assessments, followed by a 12-week intervention period with personalised telehealth guidance.

 

UPLIFT trial: Integrated UPper limb and Language Impairment and Functional Training after stroke

Do you have difficulty using your arm and communicating after your stroke? The UPLIFT trial is recruiting people who are 3 to 24 months post-stroke and living in the community to test a new intensive rehabilitation program that trains arm movement and communication together. Depending on the amount of function you have, the program will be provided at home via telerehabilitation, or in person at a health clinic.

 

Improving arm function with a virtual dolphin

This research project from Edith Cowan University aims to use modern gaming technology to improve arm function, mood and cognition. In this project you submerge in a virtual underwater world and control a virtual dolphin with your arm. Anti-gravity support will be provided by an exoskeleton, which supports your arms so you can move freely. The study is designed for people who have arm weakness (hemiparesis) because of their stroke, which occurred more than 6 months ago. You will be offered 20 free training sessions over the course of 7 weeks.

 

Pilot study of a group therapy program for individuals with emotion dysregulation after an acquired brain injury

Following a brain injury, there are many reasons that you may have difficulty regulating your emotions, including injury to emotion centres in the brain and/or due to the effect of major life changes you have experienced as a result of your injury. The ER-ABI group program will introduce a range of strategies to help you to better understand and regulate your emotions. The group is designed for people who have sustained an acquired brain injury in the last 24 months (at the time of commencement of the group). Each group consists of eight weekly two-hour sessions and one follow-up session.

 

MIDAS 2: Modafinil In Debilitating Fatigue After Stroke 2

This study is recruiting community-dwelling stroke survivors who are experiencing persistent and non-resolving fatigue 3 or more months after their stroke, to test whether modafinil significantly improves participant quality of life compared to placebo. Participants will be randomised to either modafinil (200 mg daily) or an identical placebo for 56 days.

 

The relationship between thinking skills and daily functioning in adults with brain injuries

The University of Western Australia is researching how thinking skills following a brain injury like stroke affect how well people can do things such as work or hobbies. Participants will need to attend the University of Western Australia in Perth to have an assessment and complete questionnaires and tests, and attend a follow-up in three months’ time. Case managers or partners will also be invited to participate. A report about how participants went can be provided on request.

 

Disclaimer
Please note the following disclaimer applies to all research projects listed on this page:

The Stroke Foundation recognises the value of all levels of research and the welfare and experiences of those affected. The Stroke Foundation is not responsible for, and does not endorse, any research project, opportunity, or other type of project listed. Reasonable attempts have been made to ensure projects listed have appropriate approval from a recognised body. Participants are responsible for satisfying themselves that appropriate approval procedures have been met before taking part.  Participants are advised to read the participant information sheet that the researcher will provide to you. If you do agree to participate and/or you have any concerns regarding the project, these should be directed to the researcher or other contacts on the participant information sheet.

Do you have a research project? Request participants